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Coordinating Retirement Plan Definition of “Compensation” with Payroll

A frequent, but often times avoidable, operational error for retirement plans is the failure to use the proper definition of “compensation” for various plan purposes, including, without limitation, calculating employee deferrals and employer contributions. A retirement plan’s definition of compensation typically includes dozens of components that all must be properly coded in the plan sponsor’s payroll system as either eligible or ineligible plan compensation. One such component that is frequently misclassified is the value of employee equity awards, such as stock options and restricted stock. Accordingly, plan sponsors should periodically compare the plan’s definition of compensation to the employer’s payroll records to verify that the proper definition of compensation has been used for all relevant plan purposes. Performing such an audit can help identify any errors and minimize the amount of corrective contributions and other fees or expenses that may be associated with correcting the error.

Fifth Circuit Defers to Plan Administrator’s Claim Appeal Decision Involving Competing Medical Opinions

In Rittinger v. Health Alliance Life Insurance Company, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, whose jurisdiction includes Texas, analyzed the claims decision-making process of a group health plan administrator that had been granted discretion under the terms of the employer’s group health plan. The court determined that, based on such grant of discretion, the plan administrator’s decision regarding a participant’s benefits claim appeal was entitled to judicial deference, even with respect to the plan administrator’s selection of competing medical providers’ opinions. Background regarding Grant of Discretion under ERISA Under general standards, a court will consider denials of appealed benefits claims under an employer-sponsored employee benefit plan (including a group health plan) that is subject to ERISA on a “de novo” basis, which means that the court will not give any deference to the plan administrator’s prior decision on a benefit claim appeal, but instead can substitute its… Continue Reading

Final Regulations Offer New Health Coverage Options for Employers

Final regulations were recently released by the U.S. Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and the Treasury (collectively, the “Departments”) which create two new options for providing employer-sponsored group health coverage under a health reimbursement arrangement (“HRA”). The Departments also issued a set of FAQs which outline key points regarding these new HRA options and other changes reflected in the regulations. An HRA is a type of account-based health plan that employers may use to reimburse employees for their medical care expenses. Individual Coverage HRA The first option, an “Individual Coverage HRA,” may be offered by employers as an alternative to coverage under a traditional group health plan (“Traditional GHP”), subject to certain conditions. In effect, Individual Coverage HRAs extend the federal tax advantages that are afforded to Traditional GHPs (i.e., exclusion of premiums and benefits received from federal income and payroll taxes) to HRA reimbursements of an individual’s… Continue Reading

Updated Model Summary Annual Report

The U.S. Department of Labor has released updated model Summary Annual Reports (“SARs”) for retirement plans and for welfare benefit plans that are subject to ERISA. Generally, a plan that is required to file an annual Form 5500 is also required to distribute a SAR to plan participants and beneficiaries within nine months from the end of the plan year. View the updated model SAR for welfare plans. View the updated model SAR for retirement plans.

IRS Releases 2020 Inflation-Adjusted Amounts for HSAs and HDHPs

The IRS recently issued Revenue Procedure 2019-25, which sets the 2020 calendar year limits on (i) annual contributions that can be made to a health savings account (“HSA”) and (ii) annual deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums under a high deductible health plan (“HDHP”). The 2020 limits are as follows: Annual HSA contribution limits: $3,550 for self-only coverage ($50 increase from 2019); $7,100 for family coverage ($100 increase from 2019) Minimum HDHP deductibles: $1,400 for self-only coverage ($50 increase from 2019); $2,800 for family coverage ($100 increase from 2019) HDHP out-of-pocket maximum limits: $6,900 for self-only coverage ($150 increase from 2019); $13,800 for family coverage ($300 increase from 2019) View Rev. Proc. 2019-25.

Practice Tip: Warning Signs Your Plan May Have a Missing Participants Problem

When participants in a qualified retirement plan terminate employment with the plan sponsor, it can be challenging to ensure that their contact information in the plan’s records is kept up to date and accurate. Inaccurate contact information is problematic for a variety of reasons, including potentially causing an operational failure when such participants do not receive distribution of their plan benefits by their required distribution date, as well as increasing the possibility of fraud when a participant’s information is sent to the wrong address. In addition, a plan sponsor’s failure to make reasonable efforts to locate missing participants would be a breach of their fiduciary duties of loyalty and prudence. Often, the first indication that a participant may be missing is that mail sent to their last known address is returned undeliverable or their distribution checks are returned or remain uncashed. In addition, a plan sponsor should check to see… Continue Reading

Documentation of ERISA Authorized Representative Procedures

Under ERISA, a participant in an ERISA-covered plan has the right to designate an authorized representative to act on his or her behalf in connection with claims and appeals. The plan may establish reasonable procedures for determining whether an individual has been authorized to act on behalf of a claimant. Earlier this year, the DOL issued an information letter stating, in part, that: “The plan must include any procedures for designating authorized representatives in the plan’s claims procedures and in the plan’s summary plan description (“SPD”) or a separate document that accompanies the SPD.” Employers that sponsor ERISA plans should (i) verify that the claims procedures in each plan and SPD contain reasonable procedures for designating authorized representatives and (ii) amend the plan and SPD as needed. View the DOL information letter.

IRS Opens Determination Letter Program to Merged Plans and Hybrid Plans

In Revenue Procedure 2019-20, the IRS extended the determination letter program, effective as of September 1, 2019, to include merged plans resulting from a corporate merger or similar transaction. For a merged plan to be eligible for a favorable determination letter, (i) the date of the plan merger must occur no later than the last day of the first plan year beginning after the plan year that includes the closing date of the corporate transaction, and (ii) the determination letter application must be submitted between the date of the plan merger and the last day of the first plan year beginning after the date of the plan merger. In addition, the IRS will accept determination letter applications for individually designed statutory hybrid plans during a 12-month window beginning on September 1, 2019. As always, the IRS will continue to process determination letter applications for initial plan qualification and for qualification… Continue Reading

IRS Expands Self-Correction Program Under EPCRS

The IRS recently published Rev. Proc. 2019-19, which sets forth the most current consolidated statement of the correction programs under the IRS’s Employee Plans Compliance Resolution System (“EPCRS”). Pursuant to the new guidance, which became effective April 19, 2019, eligible plan sponsors may use the self-correction program (“SCP”) component of EPCRS to correct certain failures that were previously only correctable under the voluntary correction program (“VCP”) or Audit CAP components of EPCRS. Unlike VCP and Audit CAP, SCP does not require any filings or payments to the IRS. The amended SCP now includes procedures for correcting certain plan document failures and for correcting certain participant loan failures (including defaulted plan loans). Rev. Proc. 2019-19 also expands the circumstances under which certain operational failures may be corrected by plan amendment under SCP. View Rev. Proc. 2019-19. View a summary of the key changes to the SCP component of EPCRS.

Court Vacates Key Provisions of the DOL’s Association Health Plan Regulations

In its recent decision in State of New York v. U.S. Department of Labor, the federal district court for the District of Columbia vacated key provisions of the final regulations issued in 2018 by the DOL under ERISA regarding the establishment of “association health plans” (the “Final Regulations”). The Final Regulations broadened the criteria under ERISA for determining when a group of employers may join together as a “single employer” to sponsor a single group health plan in the form of an association health plan (“AHP”). The Final Regulations were applicable to fully-insured AHPs as of September 1, 2018, to existing self-funded AHPs as of January 1, 2019, and to newly created self-funded AHPs as of April 1, 2019. See our prior blog post for additional information regarding the Final Regulations. In response to the Final Regulations, 11 states and the District of Columbia sued the DOL alleging that (i) key… Continue Reading

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