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IRS Releases 2022 Inflation-Adjusted Amounts for HSAs and HDHPs

The IRS recently issued Rev. Proc. 2021-25, which sets the 2022 calendar year limits on (i) annual contributions that can be made to a health savings account (?Ç£HSA?Ç¥) and (ii) annual deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums under a high deductible health plan (?Ç£HDHP?Ç¥). The 2022 limits are as follows: Annual HSA contribution limits: $3,650 for self-only coverage ($50 increase from 2021) and $7,300 for family coverage ($100 increase from 2021); Minimum HDHP deductibles: $1,400 for self-only coverage (no change from 2021) and $2,800 for family coverage (no change from 2021); and HDHP out-of-pocket maximum limits: $7,050 for self-only coverage ($50 increase from 2021) and $14,100 for family coverage ($100 increase from 2021). Rev. Proc. 2021-25 is available here.

IRS Clarifies Taxability of Dependent Care Benefits Provided Pursuant to a Carryover or Extended Grace Period

The IRS recently issued Notice 2021-26 (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥), which addresses certain questions that were not specifically answered in the Taxpayer Certainty and Disaster Tax Relief Act of 2020 (enacted as part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021), and subsequent IRS guidance (collectively, the ?Ç£CAA Guidance?Ç¥). The CAA Guidance addressed the taxability of dependent care benefits provided under a dependent care assistance program (?Ç£DCAP?Ç¥) when a carryover or extended grace period is applied.?á As discussed in our prior blog post here, the CAA Guidance permits employers to adopt (i) a carryover of unused DCAP funds from taxable years 2020 to 2021 and 2021 to 2022 (?Ç£CAA Carryover?Ç¥) or (ii) an extended grace period for incurring DCAP claims for plan years ending in 2020 and 2021 (?Ç£CAA Extended Grace Period?Ç¥). The CAA Guidance confirms that any unused DCAP amounts carried over from one year (?Ç£Prior Year?Ç¥) to, or available in, the subsequent… Continue Reading

IRS Releases Additional FAQs on Partial Plan Terminations

During the pandemic, many employers laid off and terminated employees as businesses shut-down and then rehired employees when businesses reopened. Employers who sponsored retirement plans and incurred these fluctuations in their workforce risked that the layoffs and terminations could trigger partial retirement plan terminations, which would require 100% vesting of affected participants. Whether a partial plan termination has occurred is generally based on the facts and circumstances, but there is a rebuttable presumption that a partial plan termination has occurred if 20% or more of a plan?ÇÖs active participants have had an employer-initiated termination within a given plan year. In September of 2020, the IRS issued FAQs to clarify that when an employee was terminated and rehired within 2020, they would not be counted for purposes of determining whether a partial plan termination occurred (we reported on this guidance here). Section 209 of the Taxpayer Certainty and Disaster Tax Relief… Continue Reading

HHS Announces Final 2022 Cost-Sharing Maximums under the Affordable Care Act

HHS recently issued its final ?Ç£Notice of Benefit and Payment Parameters for 2022?Ç¥ (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥), which includes the maximum annual limitations on cost-sharing that will apply to ?Ç£essential health benefits?Ç¥ in 2022 under non-grandfathered group health plans subject to the Affordable Care Act. For this purpose, cost-sharing generally includes deductibles, coinsurance, copayments, and other required expenditures that are qualified medical expenses with respect to essential health benefits available under the plan. The 2022 limitations are (i) $8,700 for self-only coverage and (ii) $17,400 for other than self-only coverage. The Notice is available here.

Reminder: Employer Obligations Regarding Employee Life Insurance Coverage

In our prior blog post here, we discussed the case of Anastos v. IKEA Property, Inc., which highlighted the importance of an employer?ÇÖs understanding of how its group term life insurance coverage is impacted by changes in employment status, such as termination of employment, retirement, or a leave of absence. This understanding is necessary for the employer to correctly communicate to employees when life insurance coverage will end, when evidence of insurability will be required, and the requirements necessary to convert coverage. In Anastos, the employer drafted its retiree benefit plan to state that eligible retirees could continue life insurance and that, in most cases, coverage would be guaranteed with no medical certification required. When a retiree attempted to obtain this coverage, the employer admitted that its plan was misleading and that it could not obtain underwriting to provide that kind of life insurance continuation benefit. The retiree sued, and… Continue Reading

Reminder: A Release of Claims May Not Offer Blanket Protection Against Potential ERISA Claims

A recent federal district court case,?áAnastos v. IKEA Property, Inc., illustrates that a release agreement executed upon employment termination may not offer blanket protection for employers against potential future ERISA or other claims that arise after termination (and after the release agreement has been executed). In Anastos, an employee sued his former employer alleging the information provided to him about the employer?ÇÖs retiree life insurance program led him to believe that no medical certification would be required to continue his life insurance coverage post-retirement. After the employee retired, his employer informed him that life insurance coverage was not available post-termination under the employer-provided plan and that, instead, he would have to convert the coverage to a whole life insurance policy with MetLife. MetLife required a medical examination before it would issue the policy, and the employee would not be able to satisfy the medical examination requirement. The employer filed a… Continue Reading

Future Mental Health Parity Enforcement Efforts

As discussed in our blog post here, effective as of February 10, 2021, an employer-sponsored group health plan that imposes nonquantitative treatment limitations (?Ç£NQTLs?Ç¥) on mental health or substance use disorder (?Ç£MH/SUD?Ç¥) benefits must have documentation of a ?Ç£comparative analysis?Ç¥ that must demonstrate the NQTLs imposed under the plan for MH/SUD benefits are not more restrictive than the NQTLs that apply to substantially all medical/surgical benefits in a particular classification. Generally, an NQTL is a limitation on the scope of benefits for treatment that is not expressed numerically (e.g., a prior authorization requirement). Recent DOL FAQs state that, in the near term, the DOL expects to focus on the following NQTLs in its enforcement efforts: Prior authorization requirements for in-network and out-of-network inpatient services; Concurrent review for in-network and out-of-network inpatient and outpatient services; Standards for provider admission to participate in a network, including reimbursement rates; and Out-of-network reimbursement rates… Continue Reading

Guidance on Investment Advice Exemption

The DOL?ÇÖs Employee Benefits Security Administration (the ?Ç£EBSA?Ç¥) recently released additional guidance on PTE 2020-02, Improving Investment Advice for Workers and Retirees, a new prohibited transaction exemption under ERISA that was adopted on December 18, 2020 (the ?Ç£Exemption?Ç¥) (see our prior blog posts about the Exemption here and here). The guidance consists of two documents: (i) a publication titled ?Ç£Choosing the Right Person to Give You Investment Advice: Information for Investors in Retirement Plans and Individual Retirement Accounts?Ç¥ (the ?Ç£Investor Guidance?Ç¥), and (ii) a publication titled ?Ç£New Fiduciary Advice Exemption: PTE 2020-02 Improving Investment Advice for Workers & Retirees Frequently Asked Questions?Ç¥ (the ?Ç£Advisor Guidance?Ç¥). The Investor Guidance provides information on the Exemption for investors and includes a list of questions for investors to ask their investment advice providers, as well as a list of investor-focused FAQs. The Advisor Guidance is compliance focused and includes a list of FAQs targeted… Continue Reading

Guidance on Benefit Plan Cybersecurity Best Practices

Plan participants now enroll, change elections, review benefits, apply for plan loans and hardship distributions, and access account information through websites and cellphone apps. As electronic access to plan information has increased, so has the interest of hackers in obtaining the wealth of information stored electronically. Recently, the DOL?ÇÖs Employee Benefits Security Administration (the ?Ç£EBSA?Ç¥) issued the following cybersecurity guidance documents to help plan sponsors comply with their duties to protect plan information: Tips for Hiring a Service Provider with Strong Cybersecurity Practices: These tips are intended to help plan sponsors and plan fiduciaries meet their duties under ERISA to prudently select and monitor service providers. They include a list of questions to ask and considerations to make when evaluating potential service providers. Cybersecurity Program Best Practices: This guidance provides a list of 12 best practices intended to help plan fiduciaries mitigate cybersecurity risks and make prudent decisions when selecting… Continue Reading

COBRA Premium Assistance FAQs and Model Notices Issued

The DOL?áissued new model notices that may be used in connection with COBRA premium assistance requirements under the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (?Ç£ARPA?Ç¥). These model notices include (i) an ARPA General Notice, (ii) a Notice in Connection with Extended Election Periods, (iii) an Alternative Notice, and (iv) a Notice of Expiration of Period of Premium Assistance. The DOL also issued a Summary of ARPA requirements, which the DOL states should be included with the ARPA General Notice, the Alternative Notice, and the Notice in Connection with Extended Election Periods. Use of the model notices is not required. The ARPA General Notice (or its equivalent) should be sent to each COBRA qualified beneficiary (?Ç£QB?Ç¥) who experiences a COBRA qualifying event from April 1, 2021 through September 30, 2021. The FAQs issued in conjunction with the model notices state that the ARPA General Notice must be sent only to those… Continue Reading

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