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IRS Clarifies Optional Flexible Spending Account and Cafeteria Plan Enhancements

In 2020, the Taxpayer Certainty and Disaster Tax Relief Act of 2020 (the “Act”) was enacted. The Act is part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021. The Act provides employer sponsors of cafeteria plans, including health flexible spending accounts (“HFSAs”) and dependent care flexible spending accounts (“DCFSAs”) (collectively, “FSAs”), with helpful new options for easing the normal FSA use-it-or-lose-it and mid-year election change rules. Generally, the Act provides for (i) flexibility with respect to carryovers of unused FSA amounts from the 2020 and 2021 plan years (“Enhanced Carryover”); (ii) extension of the permissible period for incurring FSA claims for plan years ending in 2020 and 2021 (“Enhanced Grace Period”); (iii) a special rule regarding post-termination reimbursements from HFSAs during plan years 2020 and 2021 (“HFSA Post-Termination Option”); (iv) a special claims period and carryover rule for DCFSAs when a dependent “ages out” during the COVID-19 public health emergency; and… Continue Reading

Upcoming Compliance Deadlines

We will begin providing periodic updates on upcoming benefit compliance and/or plan amendment deadlines so that you can add them to your to-do list. Each deadline will have links to our prior blog posts that provide more detailed information about that subject.  As of February 10, 2021, an employer-sponsored group health plan that imposes nonquantitative treatment limitations (“NQTLs”) on mental health or substance use disorder benefits must make available to federal agencies, upon request, a comparative analysis of the design and application of NQTLs, including the specific findings and conclusions reached by the plan and any results of the comparative analysis that indicate the plan is or is not in compliance. For more information, please read our blog post here.

Required Minimum Distributions: A Tragedy in Three Acts

The SECURE Act and CARES Act made significant changes to required minimum distributions (“RMDs”). What should you be doing to ensure your retirement plans are administered correctly? The first step is to understand your options. SECURE Act Shifts the Start Before the SECURE Act, RMDs had to begin by April 1st of the calendar year following the later of (i) the calendar year during which the participant retires or (ii) the calendar year in which the participant turns age 70½.  Following the passage of the SECURE Act, the age cutoff in that rule changed from age 70½ to age 72, but only for individuals who turned age 70½ on or after January 1, 2020 (i.e., individuals born on or after July 1, 1949). In short, those terminated vested participants born before July 1, 1949 had to start their RMDs by April 1 of the year after turning 70½, while those… Continue Reading

Plan Record Retention Considerations in Corporate Transactions

As we’ve previously reported here, there are a number of record retention requirements applicable to employee benefit plans. Plan sponsors should be mindful of the impact and application of these requirements in the context of corporate mergers and acquisitions, especially if assets of the target’s retirement plan are to be merged into the buyer’s plan. When acquiring a company that sponsors (or has sponsored) its own retirement plan, plan sponsors should consider: Protected Benefits. Though the buyer’s plan may be amended to protect certain benefits under the target’s plan, as required by the Internal Revenue Code, in many cases the plan sponsor will need to refer to the target’s actual plan document to fully understand the specifics of the protected benefits. Missing Participants. The DOL recently issued a memorandum outlining best practices for pension plans to avoid and resolve missing participant issues (we previously discussed this issue here). Included in… Continue Reading

Puerto Rico to Allow Rollovers from the Government Plan for Puerto Rico Employees to Qualified Retirement Plans

On January 20, 2021, the Puerto Rico Department of Treasury released Administrative Determination No. 21-01 (“AD 21-01”), allowing for direct and indirect rollovers of lump-sum distributions from the defined contribution government plan for Puerto Rico employees to a plan that is qualified under Section 1081.01(a) of the Puerto Rico Internal Revenue Code of 2011, as amended (the “Code”), maintained by a private-sector employer. Such rollovers would be considered exempt transactions and would not be subject to income tax withholding under Section 1081.01(b) of the Code. The provisions of AD 21-01 are effective immediately. AD 21-01 is available here.

IRS Issues Updated FAQs on Certain COVID-Related Employer Tax Credits

The IRS recently issued updated FAQs related to the expanded paid sick and family leave tax credits authorized under the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 (the “CAA”). Specifically, the CAA extends through March 31, 2021, the availability of paid sick and family leave credits, which were first adopted in the Families First Coronavirus Response Act in March 2020. The extended paid leave tax credits are not new benefits and simply extend the period of time during which eligible employers may claim the credits. Consequently, if an employer has already claimed the maximum amount of these tax credits, they will not be eligible to claim additional paid leave tax credits. For additional information on the paid sick and family leave tax credits, please see our prior blog posts here and here.  The IRS has yet to update its FAQs for changes made in the CAA to the terms and conditions of… Continue Reading

February Deadline to Have Mental Health Parity Documentation in Place

The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (the “CAA”) requires an employer-sponsored group health plan that imposes nonquantitative treatment limitations (“NQTLs”) on mental health or substance use disorder benefits to perform and document a comparative analysis of the design and application of NQTLs. For example, a plan that imposes prior authorization requirements on any mental health or substance use disorder benefits would need to document: (i) all the benefits that require prior authorization; (ii) the factors used to determine which benefits were subject to prior authorization, such as excessive utilization or high variability in cost per episode of care, and whether any factors were given more weight than others and why; (iii) the sources used to define the factors, such as internal claims analysis or national accreditation standards; and (iv) that the process, strategies, and evidentiary standards used in applying prior authorization requirements are comparable and no more stringently applied to mental… Continue Reading

Before Cleaning Out Files, Brush Up on Record Retention Requirements

Our world is filled with paper and electronic records, and the HR departments at most companies are no exception. Enrollment forms, notices, plan documents, summary plan descriptions, benefit statements, and service records are just a few of the records that fill the HR department’s file cabinets and computer storage. While it might be tempting to clean out files, plan sponsors should exercise care before disposing of any files relating to benefits under a plan. A clean desk today could create headaches tomorrow. Generally, ERISA requires an employer to retain plan records to support plan filings, including the annual Form 5500, for at least six years from the filing date (ERISA §107) and to maintain records for each employee sufficient to determine the benefits due or that may become due to such employee (ERISA §209), with no time limit on such requirement. In addition, HIPAA requires retention of the policies and… Continue Reading

Extension of Employment Tax Deadlines

Pursuant to Section 274 of the COVID-related Tax Relief Act of 2020, the IRS recently issued Notice 2021-11 which extends the repayment dates for the payroll tax deferral relief provided under IRS Notice 2020-65 (discussed in our prior blog post here). Under IRS Notice 2020-65, deferred employment taxes had to be withheld and remitted to the IRS in substantially equivalent installments from wages or other compensation paid to employees between January 1, 2021 and April 30, 2021, with interest and penalties on unpaid deferred taxes beginning to accrue on May 1, 2021. Under Notice 2021-11, the timing for withholding and payment of these taxes is extended through December 31, 2021, and the date that interest and penalties begin to accrue on unpaid deferred taxes is delayed until January 1, 2022. Notice 2021-11 is available here.

DOL Issues Missing Participant Guidance

The DOL issued three pieces of guidance relating to missing participants in tax-qualified retirement plans. In response to the new guidance, described in more detail below, employers should again review their plan documents and any plan policies and procedures, to ensure they align with the DOL’s requirements and best practices for avoiding and handling missing participants. In Field Assistance Bulletin No. 2021-01, the DOL issued a temporary enforcement policy on the use of the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation’s (“PBGC”) Defined Contribution Missing Participants Program for terminating defined contribution plans. Under the temporary enforcement policy, the DOL will not pursue violations under ERISA’s fiduciary rules if the plan fiduciary of a terminating defined contribution plan transfers the benefits of missing participants to the PBGC under the program and otherwise follows the requirements of the DOL fiduciary safe harbor regulation at 29 CFR 2550.404a-3. In Compliance Assistance Release No. 2021-01, the DOL issued… Continue Reading

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