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IRS Extends Tax-Relief for Employees?ÇÖ Leave-Based Charitable Donation Payments

In Notice 2020-46, the IRS provided guidance regarding cash payments made by employers to certain charitable organizations for the relief of COVID-19 victims under employer-sponsored, leave-based donation programs (see our prior blog post about Notice 2020-46 here). Under such donation programs, an employee could elect to forgo paid vacation, sick, or personal leave in exchange for cash payments made by his or her employer to qualifying charitable organizations for the relief of COVID-19 victims, without having such amounts being included in his or her taxable gross income. Under Notice 2020-46, such cash payments had to be made before January 1, 2021; however, in Notice 2021-42, the IRS extended this relief period to include qualifying cash payments that are made after December 31, 2020 and before January 1, 2022. Notice 2021-42 is available here.

IRS Clarifies Taxability of Dependent Care Benefits Provided Pursuant to a Carryover or Extended Grace Period

The IRS recently issued Notice 2021-26 (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥), which addresses certain questions that were not specifically answered in the Taxpayer Certainty and Disaster Tax Relief Act of 2020 (enacted as part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021), and subsequent IRS guidance (collectively, the ?Ç£CAA Guidance?Ç¥). The CAA Guidance addressed the taxability of dependent care benefits provided under a dependent care assistance program (?Ç£DCAP?Ç¥) when a carryover or extended grace period is applied.?á As discussed in our prior blog post here, the CAA Guidance permits employers to adopt (i) a carryover of unused DCAP funds from taxable years 2020 to 2021 and 2021 to 2022 (?Ç£CAA Carryover?Ç¥) or (ii) an extended grace period for incurring DCAP claims for plan years ending in 2020 and 2021 (?Ç£CAA Extended Grace Period?Ç¥). The CAA Guidance confirms that any unused DCAP amounts carried over from one year (?Ç£Prior Year?Ç¥) to, or available in, the subsequent… Continue Reading

Last Day for Coronavirus-Related Distributions is December 30, 2020

As a reminder, the last day that coronavirus-related distributions may be made from an eligible retirement plan to a qualified individual is December 30, 2020, and not December 31, 2020.?á Distributions may be included in income ratably over the 2020, 2021, and 2022 tax years or, if the participant elects, may be included entirely in income in 2020.?á For more information on coronavirus-related distributions, please see the IRS FAQs here.

IRS Expands Definition of Qualified Individual for Loans and Coronavirus-Related Distributions under the CARES Act

Notice 2020-50 provides additional guidance to taxpayers and sponsors of qualified retirement plans regarding coronavirus-related distributions and loan extensions under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the ?Ç£CARES Act?Ç¥). Among the guidance included in Notice 2020-50 are the following three items of special importance to plan sponsors: Notice 2020-50 expands the definition of ?Ç£Qualified Individual?Ç¥ for purposes of eligibility to receive a coronavirus-related distribution or special loan treatment to also include three new categories of individuals: an individual having a reduction in pay (or self-employment income) due to COVID-19 or having a job offer rescinded or start date for a job delayed due to COVID-19; an individual whose spouse or a member of the individual?ÇÖs household (as defined below) is quarantined, furloughed or laid off, or has work hours reduced due to COVID-19, is unable to work due to lack of childcare due to COVID-19, has a reduction… Continue Reading

Use Care When Implementing CARES Act Retirement Plan Distributions ?Çô State Law and Benefit Offset Concerns

As we have previously reported on our blog here and here, the CARES Act provided relief to participants in retirement plans by allowing employers to amend their retirement plans to include certain coronavirus-related distributions and to permit increased loan amounts for certain qualified individuals. Many employers have agreed to adopt these changes, and under federal law, the treatment of these distributions is clear. But there are other issues that employers and employees should consider, including: The coronavirus-related distributions could be subject to taxation under state law, even if the employee later repays the distribution to the plan; and If employees are receiving unemployment and/or disability benefits, the coronavirus-related distributions may reduce or offset these benefits. However, the enhanced loans would not be subject to taxation and may not offset unemployment and disability benefits, which may make the enhanced loan a better option for employees who anticipate paying back the distribution.… Continue Reading

IRS Releases FAQs on Retirement Plan Relief Under the CARES Act

The IRS recently published guidance in the form of FAQs related to the implementation of retirement plan relief available under the CARES Act. While the guidance does not resolve all of the open issues, it does provide some helpful clarifications and insight into what we may expect from future guidance. Specifically, the guidance confirms that the CARES Act provisions allowing for coronavirus-related distributions (?Ç£CRDs?Ç¥) and loan relief are permissible, not required. Furthermore, the guidance points out that even if a 401(k) plan decides not to allow CRDs, if an individual meets the requirements to be a ?Ç£qualified individual,?Ç¥ he or she may be able to treat other plan distributions as a CRD for federal tax purposes. Individuals need to consult with their personal tax advisors on these matters. Finally, alluding to what we may expect from future guidance, the CARES Act FAQs referred back to IRS Notice 2005-92 (issued on… Continue Reading

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