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Prepare Benefits Materials in Consideration of the Surprise Medical Billing Rules and Model Notice

As employers prepare group health plans, SPDs, and other employee benefits materials for 2022, they need to consider the new surprise medical billing requirements under the No Surprises Act of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021. Interim final rules were recently released for these new requirements, which are generally effective for plan years beginning on or after January 1, 2022. Provisions that may need to be changed include those regarding: (i) coverage of emergency services, including the definitions of emergency services and emergency medical conditions, how benefit payments are calculated, and coverage for out-of-network, independent freestanding emergency departments; (ii) network cost-sharing for out-of-network providers at network facilities who do not obtain consent for non-emergency services; and (iii) coverage of out-of-network air ambulance services. In addition, there is a new notice required that must be made publicly available, posted on a public website of the plan, and included in the plan’s… Continue Reading

Final 2022 ACA Cost-Sharing Limits are Lower Than Proposed Limits

The DOL, HHS, and Treasury recently published FAQs About Affordable Care Act Implementation Part 46 (the ?Ç£FAQs?Ç¥). The FAQs specify that the maximum annual limitations on cost-sharing for the 2022 plan year are (i) $8,700 for self-only coverage, and (ii) $17,400 for other than self-only coverage, which we previously discussed in our blog post here. These final limitations reflect a reduction in the amounts originally proposed by HHS (i.e., $9,100 for self-only coverage and $18,200 for other than self-only coverage), and the FAQs provide an explanation of why the finalized limits are different from the proposed limits. The FAQs are available?áhere.

HHS Announces Final 2022 Cost-Sharing Maximums under the Affordable Care Act

HHS recently issued its final ?Ç£Notice of Benefit and Payment Parameters for 2022?Ç¥ (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥), which includes the maximum annual limitations on cost-sharing that will apply to ?Ç£essential health benefits?Ç¥ in 2022 under non-grandfathered group health plans subject to the Affordable Care Act. For this purpose, cost-sharing generally includes deductibles, coinsurance, copayments, and other required expenditures that are qualified medical expenses with respect to essential health benefits available under the plan. The 2022 limitations are (i) $8,700 for self-only coverage and (ii) $17,400 for other than self-only coverage. The Notice is available here.

Regulations Provide for More Cost Transparency in Health Coverage

The federal Departments of Health and Human Services, Labor, and the Treasury (collectively, the ?Ç£Departments?Ç¥) have jointly issued final regulations that are intended to provide for more transparency in health coverage (the ?Ç£Regulations?Ç¥). The Regulations have important implications for employer sponsors of certain group health plans (?Ç£Plans?Ç¥) and health insurers. The Regulations do not apply to health plans that are grandfathered under the Affordable Care Act, health reimbursement arrangements, certain other account-based group health plans, or short-term limited duration insurance. The Regulations require two key forms of disclosures (collectively, the ?Ç£Disclosures?Ç¥) in order to provide for this improved transparency: Self-Service Disclosure. First, the Regulations require Plans and insurers in the individual and group markets to disclose certain cost-sharing information upon request to a participant, beneficiary, or enrollee (or his or her authorized representative), including (a) an estimate of the individual?ÇÖs cost-sharing liability for covered items or services furnished by a… Continue Reading

Additional Rules Issued Regarding Coverage of COVID-19 Preventive Care

Federal agencies issued a new interim final rule that applies to group health plans that are subject to the Affordable Care Act (?Ç£ACA?Ç¥) and not grandfathered under the ACA. These plans are required to cover, without cost-sharing, qualifying coronavirus preventive services (including recommended COVID-19 immunizations) within 15 business days after the date the preventive service either (i) receives an A or B rating from the United States Preventive Services Task Force or (ii) has a recommendation from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Coverage must be provided for any qualifying coronavirus preventive service received in-network or out-of-network. If there is no negotiated rate between the plan and provider, the plan must pay the provider the prevailing market rate for such service. The new rules are effective upon being published in the Federal Register and apply until the end of the public health… Continue Reading

Employer Religious and Moral Exemptions to the Provision of Contraceptive Care Remain Intact

In a recent seven-to-two opinion in the case of Little Sisters of the Poor Saints Peter and Paul Home v. Pennsylvania, et al., the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the rights of certain employers to claim exemption from providing contraceptive care under the preventive care mandate of the Affordable Care Act (?Ç£ACA?Ç¥) based on religious or moral objections. General Background of the Case The ACA requires covered employers to provide women with ?Ç£preventive care and screenings?Ç¥ without any cost sharing requirements (the ?Ç£Preventive Care Mandate?Ç¥). The ACA relies on ?Ç£preventive care guidelines?Ç¥ (?Ç£Guidelines?Ç¥) supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (?Ç£HRSA?Ç¥), an agency of the federal Department of Health and Human Services, to determine what ?Ç£preventive care and screenings?Ç¥ should include. The Guidelines mandate that health plans provide coverage for all FDA approved contraceptive methods. When the Departments of Health and Human Services, Labor, and the Treasury (collectively, the ?Ç£Departments?Ç¥)… Continue Reading

Additional Federal Guidance Regarding COVID-19 and Telehealth Coverage: Some Employer Take-Aways

The U.S. Departments of Labor, Treasury, and Health and Human Services (the ?Ç£Departments?Ç¥) recently issued FAQs regarding the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), and COVID-19. A number of these FAQs address a group health plan?ÇÖs required coverage of COVID-19 tests, including which tests must be covered, related facility fees, reimbursement rates, and balance billing to patients. Employers should ensure that the third party administrators of their group health plans have incorporated this guidance for plan administration purposes. In addition, some of the other FAQs may be of interest to employers. For example, the FAQs provide that, if a group health plan reverses the increased coverage of COVID-19 or telehealth after the COVID-19 public health emergency period is over, the Departments will consider the plan to have satisfied the requirement to provide advance notice of changes to the Summary of Benefits… Continue Reading

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