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IRS Releases 2023 Inflation-Adjusted Amounts for HSAs and HDHPs

The IRS recently issued Rev. Proc. 2022-24, which sets the 2023 calendar year limits on (i) annual contributions that can be made to a health savings account (“HSA”) and (ii) annual deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums under a high deductible health plan (“HDHP”). The 2023 limits are as follows: Annual HSA contribution limits: $3,850 for self-only coverage ($200 increase from 2022) and $7,750 for family coverage ($450 increase from 2022); Minimum HDHP deductibles: $1,500 for self-only coverage ($100 increase from 2022) and $3,000 for family coverage ($200 increase from 2022); and HDHP out-of-pocket maximum limits: $7,500 for self-only coverage ($450 increase from 2022) and $15,000 for family coverage ($900 increase from 2022). Rev. Proc. 2022-24 is available here.

Action Item for Employers with HSA-Eligible Health Plans in Oklahoma

Beginning November 1, 2021, a new Oklahoma state insurance law requires health insurers providing pharmacy benefits and pharmacy benefit managers (“PBMs”) to count any amount paid on behalf of a participant towards that participant’s out-of-pocket maximum, deductible, copayment, coinsurance, or other cost-sharing arrangement. The law appears to be intended to apply only to pharmacy benefits. Counting such third-party payments, such as a prescription drug manufacturer’s coupon, towards a participant’s deductible could cause the participant to be ineligible for a health savings account (“HSA”). The Oklahoma Insurance Department has stated it is seeking clarification from the Oklahoma legislature regarding the conflict between the state statute and the federal rules governing HSA eligibility. Employers may want to contact their health insurers and PBMs (i) to determine whether any third-party payments are being applied toward the deductible under an HSA-eligible health plan and (ii) to communicate any relevant information to participants who may be affected. This new law… Continue Reading

IRS Releases 2022 Inflation-Adjusted Amounts for HSAs and HDHPs

The IRS recently issued Rev. Proc. 2021-25, which sets the 2022 calendar year limits on (i) annual contributions that can be made to a health savings account (?Ç£HSA?Ç¥) and (ii) annual deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums under a high deductible health plan (?Ç£HDHP?Ç¥). The 2022 limits are as follows: Annual HSA contribution limits: $3,650 for self-only coverage ($50 increase from 2021) and $7,300 for family coverage ($100 increase from 2021); Minimum HDHP deductibles: $1,400 for self-only coverage (no change from 2021) and $2,800 for family coverage (no change from 2021); and HDHP out-of-pocket maximum limits: $7,050 for self-only coverage ($50 increase from 2021) and $14,100 for family coverage ($100 increase from 2021). Rev. Proc. 2021-25 is available here.

HHS Announces Final 2022 Cost-Sharing Maximums under the Affordable Care Act

HHS recently issued its final ?Ç£Notice of Benefit and Payment Parameters for 2022?Ç¥ (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥), which includes the maximum annual limitations on cost-sharing that will apply to ?Ç£essential health benefits?Ç¥ in 2022 under non-grandfathered group health plans subject to the Affordable Care Act. For this purpose, cost-sharing generally includes deductibles, coinsurance, copayments, and other required expenditures that are qualified medical expenses with respect to essential health benefits available under the plan. The 2022 limitations are (i) $8,700 for self-only coverage and (ii) $17,400 for other than self-only coverage. The Notice is available here.

IRS Announces that Purchases of Personal Protective Equipment are Tax Deductible

In Announcement 2021-7 (the ?Ç£Announcement?Ç¥), the IRS clarified that the costs to purchase personal protective equipment (?Ç£PPE?Ç¥), such as masks, hand sanitizers, and sanitizing wipes, for the primary purpose of preventing the spread of COVID-19, are tax deductible as a medical expense. Specifically, the amounts paid for PPE will be treated as amounts paid for medical care under Section 213(d) of the Internal Revenue Code. The costs of PPE are also eligible to be paid or reimbursed by health flexible spending arrangements, Archer medical savings accounts, health reimbursement arrangements, and health savings accounts. However, if the PPE expense is paid or reimbursed by such an arrangement or account, then the expense will not be tax deductible as a medical expense. The IRS also stated that group health plans may be amended to provide for the reimbursement of PPE expenses incurred for any period beginning on or after January 1, 2020… Continue Reading

IRS Proposed Regulations Address the Elimination of the Deduction for Certain Qualified Transportation Fringe Expenses

On June 23, 2020, the IRS released proposed regulations regarding the deduction of certain employer-provided transportation and commuting benefits to reflect changes made to Section 274 of the Internal Revenue Code by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the ?Ç£TCJA?Ç¥). The TCJA eliminated deductions by employers for qualified transportation fringe (?Ç£QTF?Ç¥) expenses for amounts paid or incurred in the taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017. Key issues addressed in the proposed regulations include: (i) the amount of parking expenses that is not deductible when an employer owns or leases the parking facility; (ii) the amount of QTF expenses that is not deductible when an employer pays a third party to provide QTF benefits; (iii) the amount of certain expenses or reimbursements relating to transportation between an employee?ÇÖs residence and place of employment that is not deductible; and (iv) the application of exceptions that may allow certain QTF expenses to… Continue Reading

EMPLOYEE BENEFIT/EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION CHANGES MADE BY THE CARES ACT

On March 27, 2020, Congress passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the ?Ç£CARES Act?Ç¥). This historic $2 trillion relief package received bipartisan support and is part of the third wave of federal government support as the nation copes with the acute economic fallout from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.  Some of the key provisions of the CARES Act that apply to health and welfare plans, educational assistance programs, retirement plans, executive compensation programs, and employment and payroll taxes are outlined below. Health and Welfare Plans Q1.      What COVID-19 testing and treatment is our company?ÇÖs employer-sponsored group health plan required to cover? The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (?Ç£FFCRA?Ç¥) requires an employer-sponsored group health plan (including a grandfathered plan under the Affordable Care Act (?Ç£ACA?Ç¥)) (a ?Ç£Plan?Ç¥) to provide coverage for COVID-19 diagnostic testing and services related to the diagnostic testing without any cost sharing (including deductibles, copayments, and… Continue Reading

IRS Guidance Regarding High Deductible Health Plans and Expenses Related to COVID-19

In Notice 2020-15 (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥), the IRS provides relief for certain expenses related to the 2019 novel coronavirus (?Ç£COVID-19?Ç¥). Generally, a high deductible health plan (?Ç£HDHP?Ç¥) must satisfy the minimum deductible and maximum out-of-pocket expense requirements under Section 223(c)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code. However, ?Ç£[t]o facilitate the nation?ÇÖs response to [COVID-19],?Ç¥ the Notice provides that a health plan that otherwise satisfies the requirements to be an HDHP will not fail to be an HDHP merely because the plan provides health benefits for testing and treatment of COVID-19 before satisfying the applicable minimum deductible requirements. Notice 2020-15 is available here.

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