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DOL Issues Missing Participant Guidance

The DOL issued three pieces of guidance relating to missing participants in tax-qualified retirement plans. In response to the new guidance, described in more detail below, employers should again review their plan documents and any plan policies and procedures, to ensure they align with the DOL?ÇÖs requirements and best practices for avoiding and handling missing participants. In Field Assistance Bulletin No. 2021-01, the DOL issued a temporary enforcement policy on the use of the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation?ÇÖs (?Ç£PBGC?Ç¥) Defined Contribution Missing Participants Program for terminating defined contribution plans. Under the temporary enforcement policy, the DOL will not pursue violations under ERISA?ÇÖs fiduciary rules if the plan fiduciary of a terminating defined contribution plan transfers the benefits of missing participants to the PBGC under the program and otherwise follows the requirements of the DOL fiduciary safe harbor regulation at 29 CFR 2550.404a-3. In Compliance Assistance Release No. 2021-01, the DOL issued… Continue Reading

The DOL Finalizes the Prohibited Transaction Exemption Covering Investment Advice Fiduciaries

The DOL recently finalized Prohibited Transaction Exemption 2020-02 ?Çô Improving Investment Advice for Workers & Retirees (?Ç£PTE 2020-02?Ç¥) for investment advice fiduciaries.?á PTE 2020-02 finalizes the proposed exemption which we previously reported on here.?á This guidance for investment advice fiduciaries completes the regulatory process that began in 2016 with the new fiduciary regulations and exemptions issued under the Obama administration, which were vacated in 2018, and the reinstatement of prior regulations and the issuance of new exemption guidance earlier this year.?á While PTE 2020-02 makes some changes to the proposed exemption, it largely retains the proposed exemption?ÇÖs protective framework, including the ?Ç£Impartial Conduct Standards?Ç¥ (under which investment advice fiduciaries must provide advice that is in the retirement investor?ÇÖs ?Ç£best interest?Ç¥), required disclosures, implementation of policies and procedures to comply with the standards and mitigate conflicts of interest, and retrospective compliance review.?á The final exemption also includes a self-correction mechanism for… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Final Regulations Regarding Timing of Qualified Plan Loan Offset Amount Rollovers

The IRS recently issued final regulations relating to amendments made to Code Section 402(c) by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the ?Ç£TCJA?Ç¥).?á The TCJA provides an extended rollover period for plan loan offset amounts that are treated as distributed from a qualified plan due to (i) termination of the plan or (ii) failure to repay the loan due to the participant?ÇÖs severance from employment, each a ?Ç£qualified plan loan offset?Ç¥ (?Ç£QPLO?Ç¥).?á Although most of the general rules relating to plan loan offsets apply to QPLO amounts, the permissible rollover period is extended.?á Generally, a participant has only 60 days to contribute the loan offset amount in a tax-free rollover to another qualified retirement plan.?á However, a participant may roll over QPLO amounts into another qualified retirement plan until the due date for his or her personal income tax return for the year in which the QPLO occurred.… Continue Reading

Is it Time for an Investment Committee Tune-up?

Companies sponsoring a 401(k) plan to help their employees save for retirement often form an investment committee to help select plan investments without realizing the duties that the committee assumes.?á To help prevent investment committee members from unintentionally breaching their fiduciary duties, companies periodically review their investment committee compliance and should keep complete records of appointments, policies, and procedures.?á The following investment committee checklist can be a starting point for this review: Review the underlying plan document to determine who it lists as the ?Ç£named fiduciary?Ç¥.?á Most plan documents provided by third party administrators list the ?Ç£plan sponsor?Ç¥ as the named fiduciary, which means the board of directors is the governing body responsible for acting as a fiduciary, absent a delegation of such fiduciary responsibility by the board of directors to a committee.?á If your plan lists the ?Ç£plan sponsor?Ç¥ as the named fiduciary and you have a committee selecting… Continue Reading

IRS Issue Snapshot Highlights Plan Sponsor Responsibilities to Missing Participants and Beneficiaries

The IRS recently published an Issue Snapshot (the ?Ç£Snapshot?Ç¥) on IRS.gov that revisits the steps a plan sponsor must complete in order to locate missing plan participants and beneficiaries. While the Snapshot does not contain any new guidance, its publication is an indication that ensuring plan sponsors are undertaking appropriate steps to locate missing participants and beneficiaries remains an area of focus for the IRS, including when they are conducting plan audits. Under current IRS guidance, plan sponsors should complete the following steps to attempt to locate missing plan participants and beneficiaries: Search for alternate contact information (address, telephone number, email, etc.) held by the plan or any related plan, sponsor, or publicly-available records or directories. Use a commercial locator service, credit reporting agency, or proprietary Internet search tool for locating individuals. Mail a letter via certified mail to the last known mailing address and through any appropriate means for… Continue Reading

Federal Tax Withholding and Reporting Requirements for Distributions from a Qualified Retirement Plan to a State?ÇÖs Unclaimed Property Fund

Third party administrators for employer-sponsored qualified retirement plans often recommend to employers that unclaimed account balances for mandatory cash-outs of small amounts (under $1,000) be remitted to the unclaimed property fund for the participant?ÇÖs state of residence. The IRS recently clarified in Rev. Rul. 2020-24 that amounts remitted to a state?ÇÖs unclaimed property fund are subject to withholding under Section 3405 of the Internal Revenue Code (the ?Ç£Code?Ç¥) and, in the event the amounts distributed exceed $10, reporting under Section 6047 of the Code. A plan sponsor will not be treated as failing to comply with the withholding and reporting requirements with respect to payments made before the earlier of January 1, 2022 or the date it becomes reasonably practicable for the plan sponsor to comply with such requirements. An employer that sponsors a qualified retirement plan should discuss this guidance with their plan?ÇÖs third-party administrator to ensure that any… Continue Reading

IRS Announces 2021 Qualified Retirement Plan Limits

The IRS recently announced cost-of-living adjustments for 2021. Below is a list of some of the key annual limits that will apply to qualified retirement plans in 2021: Compensation limit used in calculating a participant?ÇÖs benefit accruals: increased to $290,000. Elective deferrals to 401(k) and 403(b) plans: remains unchanged at $19,500. Annual additions to a defined contribution plan: increased to $58,000. Catch-up contributions for employees aged 50 and over to 401(k) and 403(b) plans: remains unchanged at $6,500. Annual benefit limit for a defined benefit plan: remains unchanged at $230,000. Compensation dollar limit for defining a ?Ç£key employee?Ç¥ in a top heavy plan: remains unchanged at $185,000. Compensation dollar limit for defining a ?Ç£highly compensated employee?Ç¥: remains unchanged at $130,000. View the full list of 2021 plan limits in Notice 2020-79 here.

Calculating PBGC Variable-Rate Premiums for Delayed Prior Year Contributions

Generally, when determining the value of a defined benefit plan?ÇÖs assets for purposes of calculating PBGC variable-rate premiums (?Ç£VRP?Ç¥), prior year contributions are included only if received by the plan by the date the premium is filed. The premium filing deadline for a calendar year plan is October 15th. The CARES Act, together with IRS Notice 2020-61, extended the deadline for minimum required contributions and contributions in excess of the minimum during calendar year 2020 until January 1, 2021. On September 23, 2020, the PBGC issued Technical Update 20-2 permitting contributions made in accordance with these extensions to be included for purposes of calculating the VRP. Specifically, for premium filings due on or after March 1, 2020 and before January 1, 2021 (including those due on October 15, 2020 for calendar year plans), contributions received by the plan by January 1, 2021 can be included in plan assets for determining… Continue Reading

Employee Layoffs Due to COVID-19 Can Trigger Partial Retirement Plan Termination

Under current IRS guidance, when a ?Ç£significant?Ç¥ number of participants cease to be eligible to participate in a tax qualified retirement plan, such as due to involuntary terminations of employment, a partial plan termination has occurred, and the affected participants must be made 100% fully vested in their account balances. The IRS considers an involuntary reduction in the number of plan participants by more than 20% in a given plan year to be significant for that purpose. In light of the significant disruptions to many employers?ÇÖ businesses due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the question arises whether any of their workforce reductions also triggered a partial plan termination. The IRS recently issued FAQs which clarify that employees who are laid off or terminated in 2020 but are rehired by their employer by the end of 2020 will not have incurred an involuntary termination of employment for purposes of determining whether a… Continue Reading

Postponed Deadline for Reporting and Payment of Excise Taxes

The IRS recently released Announcement 2020-17 (the ?Ç£Announcement?Ç¥) postponing the due dates for reporting and paying excise taxes related to certain delayed minimum required contributions to single employer defined benefit plans. The Announcement only applies to excise taxes under Internal Revenue Code Sections 4971(a)(1) (failure to meet minimum funding standards) and 4971(f)(1) (failure to pay liquidity shortfall). Generally, these taxes must be reported and paid by the last day of the seventh month after the end of the employer?ÇÖs tax year or eight and one-half months after the last day of the plan year that ends with or within the filer?ÇÖs tax year. However, because the CARES Act postpones the deadline to make minimum required contributions that are otherwise due in 2020 until January 1, 2021, the Department of Treasury and the IRS are extending the deadline to report and pay the excise taxes under Sections 4971(a)(1) and 4971(f)(1) with… Continue Reading

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