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Federal Tax Withholding and Reporting Requirements for Distributions from a Qualified Retirement Plan to a State?ÇÖs Unclaimed Property Fund

Third party administrators for employer-sponsored qualified retirement plans often recommend to employers that unclaimed account balances for mandatory cash-outs of small amounts (under $1,000) be remitted to the unclaimed property fund for the participant?ÇÖs state of residence. The IRS recently clarified in Rev. Rul. 2020-24 that amounts remitted to a state?ÇÖs unclaimed property fund are subject to withholding under Section 3405 of the Internal Revenue Code (the ?Ç£Code?Ç¥) and, in the event the amounts distributed exceed $10, reporting under Section 6047 of the Code. A plan sponsor will not be treated as failing to comply with the withholding and reporting requirements with respect to payments made before the earlier of January 1, 2022 or the date it becomes reasonably practicable for the plan sponsor to comply with such requirements. An employer that sponsors a qualified retirement plan should discuss this guidance with their plan?ÇÖs third-party administrator to ensure that any… Continue Reading

IRS Expands Reasons for Self-Certification of Eligibility for a Waiver of the 60-Day Rollover Requirements

The Internal Revenue Code provides that amounts distributed from a qualified plan or individual retirement arrangement (?Ç£IRA?Ç¥) will be excluded from income if they are transferred to an eligible retirement plan within 60 days following the day of receipt. The IRS previously announced in Rev. Proc. 2016-47 (the ?Ç£Prior Rev. Proc.?Ç¥) that individuals who fail to rollover retirement plan distributions into a new retirement plan or IRA within 60 days may self-certify to the new plan?ÇÖs administrator or the IRA?ÇÖs trustee that the individual qualifies for a waiver of the 60-day rollover requirement. The Prior Rev. Proc. listed 11 reasons that support waiving the 60-day rollover requirement, which include an error committed by a financial institution, a lost or uncashed distribution check, or the death or serious illness of a family member. In Rev. Proc. 2020-46, the IRS expanded this list to include instances in which the distribution was made… Continue Reading

IRS Announces 2021 Qualified Retirement Plan Limits

The IRS recently announced cost-of-living adjustments for 2021. Below is a list of some of the key annual limits that will apply to qualified retirement plans in 2021: Compensation limit used in calculating a participant?ÇÖs benefit accruals: increased to $290,000. Elective deferrals to 401(k) and 403(b) plans: remains unchanged at $19,500. Annual additions to a defined contribution plan: increased to $58,000. Catch-up contributions for employees aged 50 and over to 401(k) and 403(b) plans: remains unchanged at $6,500. Annual benefit limit for a defined benefit plan: remains unchanged at $230,000. Compensation dollar limit for defining a ?Ç£key employee?Ç¥ in a top heavy plan: remains unchanged at $185,000. Compensation dollar limit for defining a ?Ç£highly compensated employee?Ç¥: remains unchanged at $130,000. View the full list of 2021 plan limits in Notice 2020-79 here.

Want to Elect to Have a Safe Harbor Plan for 2021? ?Çô The Time is Now

As we previously reported here, earlier this year, the IRS provided relief to plan sponsors of safe harbor 401(k) and 403(b) plans, allowing them to amend their plans mid-year to suspend or reduce safe harbor contributions through the end of the 2020 plan year. Many employers elected to make this change in order to reduce overall costs to help them weather the COVID-19 pandemic. Plan sponsors who want to go back to a safe harbor plan design for 2021 must (i) amend their plan documents before the end of the year to include safe harbor contributions; (ii) notify their third party administrators as soon as possible so that the third party administrator is prepared to administer the plan as a safe harbor plan; and (iii) provide the required safe harbor notice to participants at least 30 days (and not more than 90 days) before the beginning of the plan year.… Continue Reading

The DOL Issues Guidance Regarding Lifetime Income Illustrations

The DOL recently issued an interim final rule (?Ç£IFR?Ç¥) pursuant to the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019 (the ?Ç£SECURE Act?Ç¥) regarding the information that must be provided on pension benefit statements. ERISA requires plan administrators of defined contribution plans to provide periodic pension benefit statements to participants and certain beneficiaries. The SECURE Act requires plan administrators to provide annual statements illustrating participants?ÇÖ accrued benefits as two lifetime income stream illustrations: (i) a single life annuity, and (ii) a qualified joint and survivor annuity. The IFR describes certain required assumptions plan administrators must use when converting a participant?ÇÖs accrued benefit into lifetime income streams. The lifetime income stream illustrations must be accompanied by clear and understandable explanations of the assumptions underlying the illustrations. To assist plan administrators, the IFR provides model language that may be used to satisfy this explanation requirement. The IFR is effective September… Continue Reading

Employee Layoffs Due to COVID-19 Can Trigger Partial Retirement Plan Termination

Under current IRS guidance, when a ?Ç£significant?Ç¥ number of participants cease to be eligible to participate in a tax qualified retirement plan, such as due to involuntary terminations of employment, a partial plan termination has occurred, and the affected participants must be made 100% fully vested in their account balances. The IRS considers an involuntary reduction in the number of plan participants by more than 20% in a given plan year to be significant for that purpose. In light of the significant disruptions to many employers?ÇÖ businesses due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the question arises whether any of their workforce reductions also triggered a partial plan termination. The IRS recently issued FAQs which clarify that employees who are laid off or terminated in 2020 but are rehired by their employer by the end of 2020 will not have incurred an involuntary termination of employment for purposes of determining whether a… Continue Reading

Approaching Deadline for Cash Balance Plans to Submit IRS Determination Letter Applications

Sponsors of retirement plans that use a statutory hybrid benefit formula (e.g., cash balance plans) have until August 31, 2020 to submit such plans to the IRS for a favorable determination letter. However, because ?Ç£interested parties?Ç¥ must be notified of the filing at least ten days in advance of the submission, the decision on whether to file must be made sooner (within the next week or so). Among other things, under this special determination letter cycle for cash balance plans, the IRS will review plan provisions implementing the final cash balance plan regulations. This is true even if the plan?ÇÖs cash balance formula was in place when the plan received a prior favorable determination letter. The guidance allowing for the special cycle for cash balance plans is available here.

IRS Publishes Updated Operational Compliance Checklist

The IRS recently published an updated Operational Compliance Checklist (the ?Ç£Checklist?Ç¥), which lists changes in qualification requirements that became effective during the 2016 through 2020 calendar years. Examples of items added to the Checklist for 2020 include, among other things: Final regulations relating to hardship distributions; Temporary nondiscrimination relief for closed defined benefit pension plans; Penalty-free withdrawals from retirement plans for individuals in cases of birth or adoption; and Increase in age for required beginning date for mandatory distributions. The Checklist is only available online and is updated periodically to reflect new legislation and IRS guidance.?á The Checklist does not, however, include routine, periodic changes, such as cost-of-living increases, spot segment rates, and applicable mortality tables, which can instead be found on the IRS?ÇÖs Recently Published Guidance webpage here. The Checklist is available here.

IRS Extends Deadline to Roll Over Waived RMD Distributions / Provides Model Amendment

The IRS issued Notice 2020-51 which provides additional guidance and relief relating to the required minimum distribution (?Ç£RMD?Ç¥) waiver provisions in Section 2203 of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the ?Ç£CARES Act?Ç¥). The CARES Act waived the requirement to make RMDs in 2020. Distributed amounts that?Çöbut for the CARES Act waiver?Çöwould have been RMDs are instead treated as eligible rollover distributions. Generally, the deadline to roll over an eligible rollover distribution into an IRA or another qualified plan is 60 days from the distribution date. However, for those eligible rollover distributions made in 2020 that otherwise would have been RMDs and for which the 60-day rollover period expires before August 31, 2020, the IRS extended the rollover deadline to August 31, 2020. Additionally, Notice 2020-51 includes a Q&A relating to the waiver of RMDs in 2020 and a model amendment that plan sponsors can adopt to provide… Continue Reading

IRS Relief Allows Individuals to Make Participant Elections Electronically

Treasury Regulations ?º 1.401(a)-21(d)(6) requires participant elections, including spousal consents, to be witnessed in the physical presence of a plan representative or notary public.?á In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the IRS recently issued Notice 2020-42 (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥) to allow individuals making participant elections to do so through electronic means for the period from January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020.?á For participant elections, including spousal consents, that require a signature to be witnessed in the physical presence of a notary public, the ?Ç£physical presence?Ç¥ requirement is satisfied if remote notarization is done through live audio-video technology that otherwise satisfies the requirements of Treasury Regulations ?º 1.401(a)-21(d)(6) and is compliant with state law applicable to notaries.?á For participant elections, including spousal consents, that require a signature to be witnessed in the physical presence of a plan representative, the ?Ç£physical presence?Ç¥ requirement is satisfied if (i) the person signing the participant… Continue Reading

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