[firm] blog logo

IRS Clarifies Optional Flexible Spending Account and Cafeteria Plan Enhancements

In 2020, the Taxpayer Certainty and Disaster Tax Relief Act of 2020 (the “Act”) was enacted. The Act is part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021. The Act provides employer sponsors of cafeteria plans, including health flexible spending accounts (“HFSAs”) and dependent care flexible spending accounts (“DCFSAs”) (collectively, “FSAs”), with helpful new options for easing the normal FSA use-it-or-lose-it and mid-year election change rules. Generally, the Act provides for (i) flexibility with respect to carryovers of unused FSA amounts from the 2020 and 2021 plan years (“Enhanced Carryover”); (ii) extension of the permissible period for incurring FSA claims for plan years ending in 2020 and 2021 (“Enhanced Grace Period”); (iii) a special rule regarding post-termination reimbursements from HFSAs during plan years 2020 and 2021 (“HFSA Post-Termination Option”); (iv) a special claims period and carryover rule for DCFSAs when a dependent “ages out” during the COVID-19 public health emergency; and… Continue Reading

Upcoming Compliance Deadlines

We will begin providing periodic updates on upcoming benefit compliance and/or plan amendment deadlines so that you can add them to your to-do list. Each deadline will have links to our prior blog posts that provide more detailed information about that subject.  As of February 10, 2021, an employer-sponsored group health plan that imposes nonquantitative treatment limitations (“NQTLs”) on mental health or substance use disorder benefits must make available to federal agencies, upon request, a comparative analysis of the design and application of NQTLs, including the specific findings and conclusions reached by the plan and any results of the comparative analysis that indicate the plan is or is not in compliance. For more information, please read our blog post here.

Required Minimum Distributions: A Tragedy in Three Acts

The SECURE Act and CARES Act made significant changes to required minimum distributions (“RMDs”). What should you be doing to ensure your retirement plans are administered correctly? The first step is to understand your options. SECURE Act Shifts the Start Before the SECURE Act, RMDs had to begin by April 1st of the calendar year following the later of (i) the calendar year during which the participant retires or (ii) the calendar year in which the participant turns age 70½.  Following the passage of the SECURE Act, the age cutoff in that rule changed from age 70½ to age 72, but only for individuals who turned age 70½ on or after January 1, 2020 (i.e., individuals born on or after July 1, 1949). In short, those terminated vested participants born before July 1, 1949 had to start their RMDs by April 1 of the year after turning 70½, while those… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Safe Harbor Plan Guidance on Sections 102 and 103 of the SECURE Act

The IRS recently issued Notice 2020-86 (the “Notice”), which provides guidance through a series of questions and answers with respect to Sections 102 and 103 of the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019 (the “SECURE Act”). Section 102 of the SECURE Act increases the maximum automatic elective deferral percentage for automatic enrollment safe harbor plans from 10% to 15% (provided, however, that the maximum automatic deferral rate remains 10% during the initial period of automatic elective contributions).  Notably, the Notice clarifies that a QACA safe harbor 401(k) plan is not required to increase the maximum percentage, so long as the percentage is (i) applied uniformly, (ii) does not exceed 15% (or 10% during the initial period of automatic elective contributions), and (iii) satisfies certain other minimum percentage requirements as described in Code Section 401(k)(13)(C)(iii).  The Notice also clarifies that, if a plan incorporates the maximum qualified… Continue Reading

December 31st Deadline to Amend Deferred Compensation Plans

The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “TCJA”) significantly amended Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code (“Code”) by expanding the definition of a “covered employee” to also include an employee who was formerly a “covered employee” of the publicly traded corporation (i.e., the “once a covered employee, always a covered employee” rule). Under this expanded rule, anyone who was a covered employee of the publicly traded corporation (or any predecessor) for any taxable year beginning on or after January 1, 2017, will continue to be a covered employee for taxable years beginning in 2018 and later, even after the employee’s separation from service. This change potentially impacts the availability of benefit payments under certain nonqualified deferred compensation plans which provide that payments may be delayed if the company’s deduction would not be permitted under Code Section 162(m). The application of this “once-in, always-in rule” could thus result in a… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Guidance on Deadline for Discretionary Amendment to Pre-Approved Plans

Revenue Procedures 2016-37 and 2019-3 provide that the general deadline to adopt a discretionary amendment to a pre-approved qualified plan or pre-approved 403(b) plan is the end of the plan year in which the plan amendment is operationally put into effect. Each Revenue Procedure also contains an exception, which provides in part that the general deadline does not apply when a statute or IRS guidance sets forth an earlier deadline. In Revenue Procedure 2020-40, the IRS recently modified this exception to provide that the general year-end deadline does not apply when a statute or IRS guidance sets forth an earlier or later deadline. Importantly, this change only applies to pre-approved plans that are tax qualified and not to individually designed plans. Revenue Procedure 2020-40 is available here.

June 2021
S M T W T F S
« May    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Archives