[firm] blog logo

Equity Awards Granted to U.S. Participants by Non-U.S. Entities Can Lead to Unintended Consequences

Because of the various benefits, securities, and tax laws that apply to equity awards, what may be permissible (and even commonplace) in one jurisdiction, may be problematic in another. Accordingly, whenever an issuer desires to issue equity awards to service providers (e.g., employees or contractors) in a different jurisdiction, the issuer should engage benefits, securities, and tax counsel in all relevant jurisdictions early in the process to avoid any unanticipated issues that could negatively impact the value or purpose of the awards. For example, a common issue occurs when the issuer is an entity outside of the United States, but equity awards will also be made to service providers in the United States. Under U.S. tax law, there are specific requirements for determining the exercise price of stock options and stock appreciation rights (under Section 409A of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code (“Section 409A”)) that require the exercise price to… Continue Reading

DOL Increases Civil Monetary Penalties for Certain ERISA Violations

The DOL recently issued a final rule that adjusts for inflation the amounts of civil monetary penalties assessed or enforced in its regulations, including for certain ERISA violations. The adjusted penalty amounts apply to penalties assessed after January 15, 2021 and for which the associated violations occurred after November 2, 2015. Some of the penalties that were increased include the following: The maximum penalty for failing to properly file a pension or welfare benefit plan’s annual Form 5500 increased from $2,233 per day to $2,259 per day. The maximum penalty for failing to provide notices of blackout periods or of the right to divest employer securities increased from $141 per day to $143 per day (each statutory recipient is a separate violation). The maximum penalty for failing to provide employees the required Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) coverage notices increased from $119 per day to $120 per day (each employee… Continue Reading

Ordinary Employee Benefits Issues That Can Cause Extraordinary Problems in M&A Deals

Employee benefits rarely drive corporate transactions, but if the benefits of a target company are not reviewed carefully, they can sometimes derail the transaction.  Even some of the most routine facets of benefit plan administration can result in significant potential financial exposure (e.g., additional employer contributions, taxes, penalties, and fees as well as fees associated with the preparation and filing of IRS and DOL correction program applications) that could negatively affect the overall value of the target company. By identifying issues early in the transaction, the seller can prevent costly purchase price reductions and identify issues that need correction, while the buyer can avoid overpaying for a target and ensure that representation and warranty insurance will be available to cover potential claims. Some of those routine compliance issues include, but are not limited to, the following: Failing to timely file an annual Form 5500.  The DOL can assess a penalty… Continue Reading

Proceed with Caution When Modifying Equity-Based Performance Awards

Most equity-based performance awards for employees that will vest at the end of 2020 were granted well before the COVID-19 pandemic began (in fact, many were granted two years or more before the pandemic), and none of the performance metrics for these awards likely anticipated the havoc the pandemic has caused to the companies’ financial and stock performance. In many cases, the pandemic has rendered these equity-based performance awards worthless to employees because the performance metrics are not even remotely achievable. Yet, employees have been working harder than ever to meet the challenges of the pandemic. Some employers looking for ways to continue to reward and retain employees are eyeing modifications of existing equity-based performance awards to either lower the target and stretch performance goals or to eliminate the performance requirement completely, at least for awards vesting in 2020 (making the awards solely time-based). Before proceeding with any such modifications,… Continue Reading

Fifth Circuit Holds that Offering Single Stock Investments in a 401(k) Plan is Not Per-Se Imprudent

Following a spinoff, a 401(k) plan continued to offer the employer stock fund of the predecessor parent company as an investment alternative, but closed it to new investments. After the share price fell by approximately 50%, the participants brought a lawsuit against the plan fiduciaries claiming, among other things, that the fiduciary breached its duty to diversify under ERISA Section 404(a)(1)(C) by retaining the stock fund as an investment alternative. The District Court dismissed the case and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit upheld the dismissal. The Fifth Circuit held that although the stock of the former parent was not statutorily exempt from ERISA’s diversification because it was no longer a “qualifying employer security”, there was no obligation for the plan fiduciaries to force plan participants to divest from the funds. The court explained that ERISA contains no per se prohibition on individual account plans offering single-stock… Continue Reading

Evaluating Performance Goals and Incentive Compensation in Light of COVID-19

Boards and compensation committees will be reevaluating their incentive compensation arrangements in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting market uncertainty. Both long-term and short-term incentive plans can lose motivational and retention value if the performance goals are unachievable or if they do not align with market reality. Companies that have not yet established performance goals for their 2020 equity and bonus awards should carefully consider market conditions and shareholder perception before establishing goals, focusing on motivating their executives with pay for performance that aligns with shareholders’ interests, while giving the company flexibility to navigate through uncharted territory. To the extent possible, companies should also consider delaying the issuance of incentive compensation awards until there is more stability in the business and in the financial markets. Companies that have already established goals for their 2020 awards (or that are evaluating the continued effectiveness of performance goals for prior year… Continue Reading

Recent Guidance on Compensation Practices from Glass Lewis in Light of COVID-19

On March 26, 2020, Glass Lewis released its governance report discussing its approach to corporate governance in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. According to the report, Glass Lewis expects all governance issues to be impacted by COVID-19 and will be taking a pragmatic approach to corporate governance and voting on affected proposals, prioritizing disclosure and timing and certainty on such matters, and exercising discretion as appropriate. Glass Lewis states in the report that: “The stark reality is that for many workers, including executives, they should not expect to be worth as much as they were before the crisis, because their free market value as human capital has now changed. There is a heavy burden of proof for boards and executives to justify their compensation levels in a drastically different market for talent . . . Trying to make executives whole at even further expense to shareholders and other employees is… Continue Reading

COVID-19 EMPLOYEE BENEFIT AND EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

In light of the recent economic developments stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, many employers are evaluating their employee benefit plans and how employee and employer costs will be impacted. The following summary provides a list of questions we have been receiving from clients over the past week, along with action items to help employers address these issues. Health and Welfare Plans and Fringe Benefits Should benefits coverage continue while an employee is on an unpaid furlough? If so, how would the employee pay the employee’s portion of the premium? Could the employee elect to drop coverage due to the reduction in hours of active service? Could the employer pay for coverage for some or all of its furloughed employees? Continued eligibility for benefits will depend on whether the employer treats the furlough as a termination of employment or as an unpaid leave of absence. The terms of the plan, including… Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Overturns Presumption of Prudence in Stock Drop Case

Employees of a drug pharmaceutical company participated in the company’s two 401(k) plans, each of which included an employer stock fund.  Over a period of years, the company used improper marketing tactics which concealed the potentially adverse effects of its drugs.  Once the company’s tactics were exposed, the Food and Drug Administration issued a black box warning for off-label use of the drugs, while subcommittees of the U.S. House of Representatives investigated the drugs and voted to restrict their use and to expand warnings related to their use.  As a result, the employer’s stock lost significant value.  Employees who participated in the 401(k) plans filed a lawsuit claiming several fiduciary violations under ERISA.  The U.S. federal district court dismissed all of the claims.  On appeal, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit reversed the decision of the district court and remanded. The first ERISA claim was that the… Continue Reading

June 2021
S M T W T F S
« May    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Archives