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CARES Act: Calculating Qualified Health Plan Expenses for Purposes of the Employee Retention Credit

Under the CARES Act, employers are eligible to claim an employee retention credit if certain conditions are met (see our prior blog post on the employee retention credit, as well as other employee benefits and executive compensation changes made by the CARES Act, here). The tax credit is equal to 50% of “qualified wages” paid to employees of up to $10,000. Qualified wages include (i) wages actually paid to covered employees (other than qualified paid sick and family leave wages for which a credit is allowed under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act) and (ii) the “qualified health plan expenses” allocable to such employees. On May 11, 2020, the IRS published new FAQs clarifying how qualified health plan expenses should be calculated for purposes of the employee retention credit. Notably, the FAQs provide guidance on how to calculate such expenses when an employer sponsors more than one health plan (e.g.,… Continue Reading

2019 FSA Claims Submission Deadlines Suspended

Many employer-sponsored flexible spending arrangements (“FSAs”) have a claims submission deadline in March 2020 for the 2019 plan year. Some FSA vendors have contacted employers about extending those claims submission deadlines to later in the summer because participants could be delayed in submitting claims due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Generally, claims submission deadlines are set by plan design and are not regulated. However, the U.S. Departments of Labor and Treasury recently issued a notice suspending the deadline for submitting claims under all employee welfare benefit plans and employee pension benefit plans. The time period from March 1, 2020 until 60 days after the end of the national emergency or other date announced by the government (“Outbreak Period”) is disregarded in determining whether the deadline to submit a claim was met. The notice did not specifically address how the suspended deadlines are supposed to work for FSAs. Arguably, if the deadline… Continue Reading

COVID-19 Relief – Added Flexibility to 125 Cafeteria Plans

Prospective Mid-Year Election Changes IRS Notice 2020-29 allows employers to amend cafeteria plans to permit employees to make the following prospective mid-year election changes (including an initial election) for employer-sponsored health coverage, health flexible spending accounts (“FSAs”), and dependent care FSAs during calendar year 2020, regardless of whether the basis for the election change satisfies the “change in status” rules under Treas. Reg.  §1.125-4: Make a new election for employer-sponsored health coverage, if the employee initially declined to elect employer-sponsored health coverage; Revoke an existing election for employer-sponsored health coverage and make a new election to enroll in different health coverage sponsored by the same employer (including changing enrollment from self-only coverage to family coverage); Revoke an existing election for employer-sponsored health coverage, provided that the employee attests in writing that the employee is enrolled, or immediately will enroll, in other health coverage not sponsored by the employer; Revoke an… Continue Reading

EMPLOYEE BENEFIT/EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION CHANGES MADE BY THE CARES ACT

On March 27, 2020, Congress passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”). This historic $2 trillion relief package received bipartisan support and is part of the third wave of federal government support as the nation copes with the acute economic fallout from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.  Some of the key provisions of the CARES Act that apply to health and welfare plans, educational assistance programs, retirement plans, executive compensation programs, and employment and payroll taxes are outlined below. Health and Welfare Plans Q1.      What COVID-19 testing and treatment is our company’s employer-sponsored group health plan required to cover? The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) requires an employer-sponsored group health plan (including a grandfathered plan under the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”)) (a “Plan”) to provide coverage for COVID-19 diagnostic testing and services related to the diagnostic testing without any cost sharing (including deductibles, copayments, and… Continue Reading

IRS Addresses Medical Expense Reimbursements Related to Ancestry Genetic Testing Services

In Private Letter Ruling 201933005 (the “PLR”), the IRS recently addressed whether certain genetic testing services and reports provided to an individual by a commercial retailer of bundled ancestry and health evaluation services (“Ancestry Provider”) constituted “medical care” expenses under Section 213(d) of the Internal Revenue Code, which would be reimbursable to the individual from his or her employer-sponsored health flexible spending arrangement (“HFSA”). Under the facts of the PLR, the Ancestry Provider (i) collected a DNA sample from an individual through a DNA testing kit, (ii) sent the sample to a third-party laboratory for genetic testing, and (iii) issued reports to the individual with results from such laboratory testing, including, among other things, information regarding the individual’s potential health risks. The IRS concluded that because the Ancestry Provider’s bundled services included both non-medical (i.e., ancestry) as well as health services, the costs of its services must be valued and… Continue Reading

Revised Data Security Standards for Payment Cards

The Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council recently released revised data security standards for payment cards, which include debit cards issued by vendors in conjunction with flexible spending accounts, health reimbursement arrangements, and health savings accounts. These revised standards update the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (“PCI DSS”) to version 3.2 and contain a variety of enhancements to protect against security threats, including revised system penetration testing requirements, enhanced policies and procedures for detecting failures, and stricter authentication protocols. The PCI DSS responsibilities fall on the card issuers, vendor service providers, merchants, etc., not on an employer which merely sponsors or facilitates a spending account benefit that utilizes debit cards. PCI DSS version 3.2 will be viewed as a “best practice” until January 31, 2018. Beginning February 1, 2018, version 3.2’s standards become mandatory for the industry. Employers sponsoring or facilitating spending account benefits utilizing debit cards should update… Continue Reading

IRS Modifies “Use-It-Or-Lose-It” Rule for Health Flexible Spending Arrangements

Notice 2013-71 modifies the “use-it-or-lose-it” rule for health flexible spending arrangements (“FSAs”) by allowing plan sponsors to amend their cafeteria plan and FSA documents to allow a participant to carry forward into the next year up to $500 of any amount remaining in the participant’s FSA at year-end.  Under the “use-it-or-lose-it” rule, all unused amounts remaining in a participant’s FSA had to be forfeited at the end of the year.  This new carryover option is an alternative to the grace period that is currently allowed (but only if the plan document includes a grace period feature).  Plan sponsors may amend their plans and FSAs to allow for a carryover from the 2013 to 2014 plan year, provided that (1) a grace period feature is not already included (or is removed), (2) the amendment is signed by the end of the 2014 plan year, and (3) participants are timely notified of… Continue Reading

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