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IRS Announces New 2023 Health and Welfare Plan Limits

The IRS recently announced the following inflation-adjusted limits for 2023 for certain health and welfare plans: Health flexible spending account limit: increased to $3,050. Qualified transportation fringe benefit monthly limits for parking and transit: each increased to $300. Adoption assistance program limit: increased to $15,950. Qualified Small Employer Health Reimbursement Arrangement limit: increased to $5,850 for individual coverage and $11,800 for family coverage. The above and other 2023 plan limits are available in Rev. Proc. 2022-38 here.

FAQs Provide Additional Guidance Regarding At-Home COVID-19 Testing Coverage Requirements

As discussed in our prior blog post here, employer-provided group health plans, and insurers and other issuers, are required to cover the cost of over-the-counter, at-home COVID-19 tests (“OTC Tests”) authorized by the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”). The DOL, HHS, and the Treasury Department (collectively, the “Departments”) previously issued guidance establishing a safe harbor that, if satisfied, allows plans and issuers to limit the reimbursement of OTC Tests to $12 per test (or the actual cost of the OTC Test, if lower). The Departments recently issued additional guidance in the form of FAQs clarifying how plans and issuers may comply with the safe harbor OTC Test coverage requirements. The FAQs clarify that whether a plan or issuer satisfies the safe harbor by providing adequate access to OTC Tests through its direct coverage program will depend on the particular facts and circumstances, but will generally require that OTC Tests are… Continue Reading

New 2022 Health and Welfare Benefits Limits: In Time for Open Enrollment?

The IRS published increased limits for 2022 for various health and welfare benefits, including: Health flexible spending account limit increased to $2,850 (from $2,750); Qualified transportation fringe benefit limit for parking and transit each increased to $280 (from $270); Adoption assistance program limit increased to $14,890 (from $14,400); and Qualified Small Employer Health Reimbursement Arrangement limit increased to $5,450 for individual coverage and $11,050 for family coverage (from $5,300 and $10,700, respectively). An employer that wants to incorporate these increased limits into its plans should determine whether the plans are drafted to automatically reflect the increased limits or whether amendments would be required. If a plan (including a health flexible spending account) is drafted to automatically incorporate any increased limits, the plan sponsor should communicate the increased limits to participants to permit changes during open enrollment for the upcoming plan year. The list of 2022 plan limits can be found in… Continue Reading

Reminder About Key 2021 Year-End Amendments

As the end of the calendar year approaches, plan sponsors are reminded to adopt certain amendments that may be required for their benefit plans to conform to regulations or reflect certain legal and/or plan design changes. Retirement Plans 2019 Required Amendments List In Notice 2019-64, the IRS published the 2019 Required Amendments List (the “List”), which lists the amendments required to be adopted by December 31, 2021. Pursuant to the List, plans offering hardship distributions must be amended in accordance with the final regulations issued under the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018. In addition, the List provides that collectively bargained cash balance/hybrid defined benefit plans maintained pursuant to collective bargaining agreements ratified on or before November 13, 2015 must be amended to comply with the final cash balance/hybrid plan regulations. The List also includes certain periodic changes that took effect in 2019, such as adjustments to various dollar limits for… Continue Reading

IRS Clarifies Taxability of Dependent Care Benefits Provided Pursuant to a Carryover or Extended Grace Period

The IRS recently issued Notice 2021-26 (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥), which addresses certain questions that were not specifically answered in the Taxpayer Certainty and Disaster Tax Relief Act of 2020 (enacted as part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021), and subsequent IRS guidance (collectively, the ?Ç£CAA Guidance?Ç¥). The CAA Guidance addressed the taxability of dependent care benefits provided under a dependent care assistance program (?Ç£DCAP?Ç¥) when a carryover or extended grace period is applied.?á As discussed in our prior blog post here, the CAA Guidance permits employers to adopt (i) a carryover of unused DCAP funds from taxable years 2020 to 2021 and 2021 to 2022 (?Ç£CAA Carryover?Ç¥) or (ii) an extended grace period for incurring DCAP claims for plan years ending in 2020 and 2021 (?Ç£CAA Extended Grace Period?Ç¥). The CAA Guidance confirms that any unused DCAP amounts carried over from one year (?Ç£Prior Year?Ç¥) to, or available in, the subsequent… Continue Reading

Big Increase in Dependent Care Flexible Spending Account Limit for 2021

The American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (?Ç£ARPA?Ç¥), which was enacted on March 11, 2021, temporarily increases the maximum amount that an employee is permitted to contribute to a dependent care flexible spending account (?Ç£FSA?Ç¥) from $5,000 to $10,500 (or from $2,500 to $5,250 for a married person filing a separate return) for the taxable year beginning in 2021. The increased dependent care FSA limit is an optional change that a plan sponsor may choose to incorporate into its dependent care program included under its cafeteria plan. This change, combined with the change under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (?Ç£CAA?Ç¥), which authorizes a cafeteria plan to permit participants to make prospective changes to their dependent care FSA contributions (see our prior blog post regarding the CAA here), allows participants to increase contributions to their dependent care FSAs in 2021. In order to implement the new dependent care FSA limit, the… Continue Reading

IRS Clarifies Optional Flexible Spending Account and Cafeteria Plan Enhancements

In 2020, the Taxpayer Certainty and Disaster Tax Relief Act of 2020 (the ?Ç£Act?Ç¥) was enacted. The Act is part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021. The Act provides employer sponsors of cafeteria plans, including health flexible spending accounts (?Ç£HFSAs?Ç¥) and dependent care flexible spending accounts (?Ç£DCFSAs?Ç¥) (collectively, ?Ç£FSAs?Ç¥), with helpful new options for easing the normal FSA use-it-or-lose-it and mid-year election change rules. Generally, the Act provides for (i) flexibility with respect to carryovers of unused FSA amounts from the 2020 and 2021 plan years (?Ç£Enhanced Carryover?Ç¥); (ii) extension of the permissible period for incurring FSA claims for plan years ending in 2020 and 2021 (?Ç£Enhanced Grace Period?Ç¥); (iii) a special rule regarding post-termination reimbursements from HFSAs during plan years 2020 and 2021 (?Ç£HFSA Post-Termination Option?Ç¥); (iv) a special claims period and carryover rule for DCFSAs when a dependent ?Ç£ages out?Ç¥ during the COVID-19 public health emergency; and… Continue Reading

Future Updates on the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021

We previously provided an overview of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 (the ?Ç£CAA?Ç¥) and the specific benefits changes employers need to focus on right now, which can be found here. There were numerous other provisions of the CAA that will impact retirement and group health plans. As the effective dates for those other provisions approach, we will provide you with a summary of the new provisions and how they may impact your plans.

The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 and Benefits Changes Employers Need to Focus on Right Now

Retirement Plans Additional Relief May Help Prevent Partial Plan Terminations The recently adopted Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 (the ?Ç£CAA?Ç¥) provides relief for qualified retirement plans of employers that had to reduce their workforce as a result of the pandemic (through furloughs, layoffs, or terminations) for plan years that include the period beginning on March 13, 2020 and ending on March 31, 2021. Specifically, these plans shall not be treated as incurring a partial plan termination if the number of active participants covered by the plan on March 31, 2021 is at least 80% of the number of active participants that were covered by the plan on March 13, 2020. A partial plan termination generally occurs when more than 20% of a plan?ÇÖs participants are terminated in a plan year. If a partial plan termination occurs, then the plan is required to 100% vest any ?Ç£affected employees?Ç¥. ?Ç£Affected employees?Ç¥ are… Continue Reading

Payments for Certain Healthcare Arrangements are Tax Deductible

The IRS recently issued proposed regulations that?áaddress the treatment of amounts paid by an individual for a ?Ç£direct primary care arrangement?Ç¥ or a ?Ç£health care sharing ministry?Ç¥ (collectively, the ?Ç£Arrangements?Ç¥) as being tax-deductible ?Ç£medical care expenses?Ç¥ under Section 213 of the Internal Revenue Code (the ?Ç£Code?Ç¥). Under the proposed regulations, a direct primary care arrangement (?Ç£DPC Arrangement?Ç¥) is defined as a contract between the individual and one or more primary care physicians pursuant to which the physician(s) agree to provide medical care for a fixed annual or periodic fee without billing a third party. A health care sharing ministry (?Ç£Sharing Ministry?Ç¥) is defined as a tax-exempt organization under Section 501(c)(3) of the Code that meets specified requirements, including that its members share a common set of ethical or religious beliefs and share medical expenses in accordance with those beliefs. HSAs and the Arrangements. The preamble to the proposed regulations confirms… Continue Reading

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