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EMPLOYEE BENEFIT/EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION CHANGES MADE BY THE CARES ACT

On March 27, 2020, Congress passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the ?Ç£CARES Act?Ç¥). This historic $2 trillion relief package received bipartisan support and is part of the third wave of federal government support as the nation copes with the acute economic fallout from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.  Some of the key provisions of the CARES Act that apply to health and welfare plans, educational assistance programs, retirement plans, executive compensation programs, and employment and payroll taxes are outlined below. Health and Welfare Plans Q1.      What COVID-19 testing and treatment is our company?ÇÖs employer-sponsored group health plan required to cover? The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (?Ç£FFCRA?Ç¥) requires an employer-sponsored group health plan (including a grandfathered plan under the Affordable Care Act (?Ç£ACA?Ç¥)) (a ?Ç£Plan?Ç¥) to provide coverage for COVID-19 diagnostic testing and services related to the diagnostic testing without any cost sharing (including deductibles, copayments, and… Continue Reading

COVID-19 EMPLOYEE BENEFIT AND EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

In light of the recent economic developments stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, many employers are evaluating their employee benefit plans and how employee and employer costs will be impacted. The following summary provides a list of questions we have been receiving from clients over the past week, along with action items to help employers address these issues. Health and Welfare Plans and Fringe Benefits Should benefits coverage continue while an employee is on an unpaid furlough? If so, how would the employee pay the employee?ÇÖs portion of the premium? Could the employee elect to drop coverage due to the reduction in hours of active service? Could the employer pay for coverage for some or all of its furloughed employees? Continued eligibility for benefits will depend on whether the employer treats the furlough as a termination of employment or as an unpaid leave of absence. The terms of the plan, including… Continue Reading

IRS Guidance Regarding High Deductible Health Plans and Expenses Related to COVID-19

In Notice 2020-15 (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥), the IRS provides relief for certain expenses related to the 2019 novel coronavirus (?Ç£COVID-19?Ç¥). Generally, a high deductible health plan (?Ç£HDHP?Ç¥) must satisfy the minimum deductible and maximum out-of-pocket expense requirements under Section 223(c)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code. However, ?Ç£[t]o facilitate the nation?ÇÖs response to [COVID-19],?Ç¥ the Notice provides that a health plan that otherwise satisfies the requirements to be an HDHP will not fail to be an HDHP merely because the plan provides health benefits for testing and treatment of COVID-19 before satisfying the applicable minimum deductible requirements. Notice 2020-15 is available here.

IRS Releases 2020 Inflation-Adjusted Amounts for HSAs and HDHPs

The IRS recently issued Revenue Procedure 2019-25, which sets the 2020 calendar year limits on (i) annual contributions that can be made to a health savings account (?Ç£HSA?Ç¥) and (ii) annual deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums under a high deductible health plan (?Ç£HDHP?Ç¥). The 2020 limits are as follows: Annual HSA contribution limits: $3,550 for self-only coverage ($50 increase from 2019); $7,100 for family coverage ($100 increase from 2019) Minimum HDHP deductibles: $1,400 for self-only coverage ($50 increase from 2019); $2,800 for family coverage ($100 increase from 2019) HDHP out-of-pocket maximum limits: $6,900 for self-only coverage ($150 increase from 2019); $13,800 for family coverage ($300 increase from 2019) View Rev. Proc. 2019-25.

High Deductible Health Plan and Health Savings Account Contribution Limits Set for 2017

The IRS announced the 2017 inflation adjusted amounts for a high deductible health plan (?Ç£HDHP?Ç¥) and health savings account (?Ç£HSA?Ç¥) contribution limits in Revenue Procedure 2016-28, as follows: Minimum HDHP deductibles ?Çô $1,300 self-only; $2,600 family (no changes from 2016) HDHP out-of-pocket maximum limits ?Çô $6,550 self-only; $13,100 family (no changes from 2016) Annual HSA contribution limits ?Çô $3,400 self-only; $6,750 family ($50 increase for self-only; no change to family contribution limit from 2016) Revenue Procedure 2016-28 is available here.

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