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Payments for Certain Healthcare Arrangements are Tax Deductible

The IRS recently issued proposed regulations that?áaddress the treatment of amounts paid by an individual for a ?Ç£direct primary care arrangement?Ç¥ or a ?Ç£health care sharing ministry?Ç¥ (collectively, the ?Ç£Arrangements?Ç¥) as being tax-deductible ?Ç£medical care expenses?Ç¥ under Section 213 of the Internal Revenue Code (the ?Ç£Code?Ç¥). Under the proposed regulations, a direct primary care arrangement (?Ç£DPC Arrangement?Ç¥) is defined as a contract between the individual and one or more primary care physicians pursuant to which the physician(s) agree to provide medical care for a fixed annual or periodic fee without billing a third party. A health care sharing ministry (?Ç£Sharing Ministry?Ç¥) is defined as a tax-exempt organization under Section 501(c)(3) of the Code that meets specified requirements, including that its members share a common set of ethical or religious beliefs and share medical expenses in accordance with those beliefs. HSAs and the Arrangements. The preamble to the proposed regulations confirms… Continue Reading

CARES Act: Calculating Qualified Health Plan Expenses for Purposes of the Employee Retention Credit

Under the CARES Act, employers are eligible to claim an employee retention credit if certain conditions are met (see our prior blog post on the employee retention credit, as well as other employee benefits and executive compensation changes made by the CARES Act, here). The tax credit is equal to 50% of ?Ç£qualified wages?Ç¥ paid to employees of up to $10,000. Qualified wages include (i) wages actually paid to covered employees (other than qualified paid sick and family leave wages for which a credit is allowed under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act) and (ii) the ?Ç£qualified health plan expenses?Ç¥ allocable to such employees. On May 11, 2020, the IRS published new FAQs clarifying how qualified health plan expenses should be calculated for purposes of the employee retention credit. Notably, the FAQs provide guidance on how to calculate such expenses when an employer sponsors more than one health plan (e.g.,… Continue Reading

COVID-19 EMPLOYEE BENEFIT AND EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

In light of the recent economic developments stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, many employers are evaluating their employee benefit plans and how employee and employer costs will be impacted. The following summary provides a list of questions we have been receiving from clients over the past week, along with action items to help employers address these issues. Health and Welfare Plans and Fringe Benefits Should benefits coverage continue while an employee is on an unpaid furlough? If so, how would the employee pay the employee?ÇÖs portion of the premium? Could the employee elect to drop coverage due to the reduction in hours of active service? Could the employer pay for coverage for some or all of its furloughed employees? Continued eligibility for benefits will depend on whether the employer treats the furlough as a termination of employment or as an unpaid leave of absence. The terms of the plan, including… Continue Reading

Final Regulations Offer New Health Coverage Options for Employers

Final regulations were recently released by the U.S. Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and the Treasury (collectively, the ?Ç£Departments?Ç¥) which create two new options for providing employer-sponsored group health coverage under a health reimbursement arrangement (?Ç£HRA?Ç¥). The Departments also issued a set of FAQs which outline key points regarding these new HRA options and other changes reflected in the regulations. An HRA is a type of account-based health plan that employers may use to reimburse employees for their medical care expenses. Individual Coverage HRA The first option, an ?Ç£Individual Coverage HRA,?Ç¥ may be offered by employers as an alternative to coverage under a traditional group health plan (?Ç£Traditional GHP?Ç¥), subject to certain conditions. In effect, Individual Coverage HRAs extend the federal tax advantages that are afforded to Traditional GHPs (i.e., exclusion of premiums and benefits received from federal income and payroll taxes) to HRA reimbursements of an individual?ÇÖs… Continue Reading

New HRA Option for Employers in 2020 May Avoid ACA Employer Penalties

New proposed rules have been issued by the federal Departments of the Treasury, Labor, and Health and Human Services that permit employers to offer health reimbursement arrangements (?Ç£HRAs?Ç¥) to employees who are enrolled in individual health insurance coverage. An employee could use such an HRA to pay the employee?ÇÖs premiums for individual health insurance and other medical expenses. The same HRA must be offered to an entire ?Ç£class?Ç¥ of employees, and a traditional group health plan could not be offered to that class. Classes of employees include full-time, part-time, seasonal, union, employees in a waiting period, employees under age 25, non-resident aliens with no U.S. income, employees in the same insurance rating area, or a combination of those classes. The HRA contribution could increase with age, reflecting the fact that health coverage for older employees is generally more expensive, and the IRS will provide an approach for varying contributions by… Continue Reading

Executive Order Directs Agencies to Consider Expanding HRAs and Alternatives to the Public Health Insurance Marketplace

On October 12, 2017, President Trump issued an Executive Order directing the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services, Labor, and the Treasury to ?Ç£consider proposing regulations or revising [existing] guidance?Ç¥ for health reimbursement arrangements (?Ç£HRAs?Ç¥), association health plans (?Ç£AHPs?Ç¥), and short-term coverage related to loosening existing requirements under the Affordable Care Act (?Ç£ACA?Ç¥).?á While the Executive Order does not literally order the agencies to issue regulations or change existing guidance, it is likely that the agencies will do so.?áThis process should take months, and thus the Executive Order is a signal of change rather than change itself.?áThere are few details at this time, but a high-level summary including open issues is below: HRAs ?Çô The clear intent is to enable employers to offer HRAs to current employees that can be used to purchase insurance policies from the individual insurance market.?áThis could be accomplished by either permitting HRAs to integrate… Continue Reading

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