[firm] blog logo

Payments for Certain Healthcare Arrangements are Tax Deductible

The IRS recently issued proposed regulations that?áaddress the treatment of amounts paid by an individual for a ?Ç£direct primary care arrangement?Ç¥ or a ?Ç£health care sharing ministry?Ç¥ (collectively, the ?Ç£Arrangements?Ç¥) as being tax-deductible ?Ç£medical care expenses?Ç¥ under Section 213 of the Internal Revenue Code (the ?Ç£Code?Ç¥). Under the proposed regulations, a direct primary care arrangement (?Ç£DPC Arrangement?Ç¥) is defined as a contract between the individual and one or more primary care physicians pursuant to which the physician(s) agree to provide medical care for a fixed annual or periodic fee without billing a third party. A health care sharing ministry (?Ç£Sharing Ministry?Ç¥) is defined as a tax-exempt organization under Section 501(c)(3) of the Code that meets specified requirements, including that its members share a common set of ethical or religious beliefs and share medical expenses in accordance with those beliefs. HSAs and the Arrangements. The preamble to the proposed regulations confirms… Continue Reading

IRS Relief Allows Individuals to Make Participant Elections Electronically

Treasury Regulations ?º 1.401(a)-21(d)(6) requires participant elections, including spousal consents, to be witnessed in the physical presence of a plan representative or notary public.?á In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the IRS recently issued Notice 2020-42 (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥) to allow individuals making participant elections to do so through electronic means for the period from January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020.?á For participant elections, including spousal consents, that require a signature to be witnessed in the physical presence of a notary public, the ?Ç£physical presence?Ç¥ requirement is satisfied if remote notarization is done through live audio-video technology that otherwise satisfies the requirements of Treasury Regulations ?º 1.401(a)-21(d)(6) and is compliant with state law applicable to notaries.?á For participant elections, including spousal consents, that require a signature to be witnessed in the physical presence of a plan representative, the ?Ç£physical presence?Ç¥ requirement is satisfied if (i) the person signing the participant… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Proposed Rule on Withholding from Periodic Payments from Pensions and Annuities

Under Section 3405(e)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code, withholding from periodic payments from pensions and annuities is determined under rules prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury. Currently, under IRS Notice 2020?Çô3, if no withholding certificate is in effect, the required withholding amount is determined by treating the payee as a married individual claiming three withholding exemptions. Under the proposed rule, beginning in 2021, the required withholding amount will be determined in the manner described in the applicable forms, instructions, publications, and other guidance prescribed by the IRS Commissioner (e.g., the annual Publication 15-T and instructions to Form W-4P). The Proposed Rule can be found here.

COVID-19 Relief ?Çô Added Flexibility to Code Section 125 Cafeteria Plans

Prospective Mid-Year Election Changes IRS Notice 2020-29 allows employers to amend cafeteria plans to permit employees to make the following prospective mid-year election changes (including an initial election) for employer-sponsored health coverage, health flexible spending accounts (?Ç£FSAs?Ç¥), and dependent care FSAs during calendar year 2020, regardless of whether the basis for the election change satisfies the ?Ç£change in status?Ç¥ rules under Treas. Reg. ?º 1.125-4: Make a new election for employer-sponsored health coverage, if the employee initially declined to elect employer-sponsored health coverage; Revoke an existing election for employer-sponsored health coverage and make a new election to enroll in different health coverage sponsored by the same employer (including changing enrollment from self-only to family coverage); Revoke an existing election for employer-sponsored health coverage, provided the employee attests in writing that the employee is enrolled, or immediately will enroll, in other health coverage not sponsored by the employer; and Revoke an… Continue Reading

Extension of Certain Timeframes for Employee Benefit Plans

On April 29, 2020, the U.S. Departments of Labor and the Treasury (together, the ?Ç£Departments?Ç¥) issued a notice (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥) requiring that all group health plans, disability and other types of employee welfare benefit plans, and employee pension benefit plans, subject to ERISA and the Internal Revenue Code, must disregard the period from March 1, 2020 until 60 days after the announced end of the COVID-19 National Emergency or such other date as announced by the Departments in a future notice (the ?Ç£Outbreak Period?Ç¥) for the following periods and dates: The 30-day period (or 60-day period, if applicable) to request HIPAA special enrollment; The 60-day election period for COBRA continuation coverage; The date for making COBRA premium payments; The date for individuals to notify the plan of a COBRA qualifying event or determination of disability; The date within which individuals may file a benefit claim under the plan?ÇÖs claims procedures;… Continue Reading

The DOL and the IRS Jointly Provide Relief from Certain Timeframes Applicable to Health and Welfare and Pension Plans

On April 28, 2020, the IRS and DOL issued a Final Rule extending certain timeframes under ERISA and the Internal Revenue Code for group health, disability and other welfare plans, pension plans, and the participants and beneficiaries under those plans. The timeframe extensions include, among other things, the time to elect COBRA and pay premiums, special enrollment timeframes under HIPPA and CHIPs, claims procedure timeframes, and certain external review process timeframes.?á Applicable plans must disregard the period from March 1, 2020 until 60 days after the announced end of the COVID-19 National Emergency for all plan participants, beneficiaries, qualified beneficiaries, or claimants wherever located in determining the enumerated time periods and dates and for providing COBRA election notices. ?áIn addition, Disaster Relief Notice 2020-01 was issued addressing the timeframe relief and addressing certain other COVID-19 relief. The Final Rule is available here:?áhttps://www.dol.gov/sites/dolgov/files/ebsa/temporary-postings/covid-19-final-rule.pdf. Disaster Relief Notice 2020-01 is available here:?áhttps://www.dol.gov/agencies/ebsa/employers-and-advisers/plan-administration-and-compliance/disaster-relief/ebsa-disaster-relief-notice-2020-01.

Spousal Consent Under a Retirement Plan During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Generally, a spouse must consent to a retirement plan participant?ÇÖs waiver of a qualified joint and survivor annuity or the designation of an optional form of benefit or an alternate beneficiary. The applicable regulations require this consent, even if signed electronically, to be witnessed in the physical presence of a plan representative or a notary public. Neither the IRS nor the DOL has issued guidance permitting the physical presence requirement to be satisfied by electronic means (for example, via webcam) even though numerous states now permit electronic notarizations. Employers should use care and consult with legal counsel when determining how to handle participants who are unable to satisfy the plan?ÇÖs current physical presence notarization requirements.

CARES Act: Additional Guidance on the Interplay Between Social Security Tax Deferrals and Forgiveness of PPP Loans

In a new set of FAQs, the IRS clarifies that an employer who receives a loan under the Paycheck Protection Program (?Ç£PPP?Ç¥) may also defer payment of the employer portion of Social Security taxes due on eligible wages until the employer receives notice from its PPP lender that the loan has been forgiven. Under the CARES Act, employers of all sizes may defer payment of their portion of Social Security taxes due on wages earned between March 27, 2020 and December 31, 2020, until December 31, 2021 (50% of the deferred taxes are due) and December 31, 2022 (the remaining deferred taxes are due), subject to certain restrictions. One of those restrictions is that an employer may not defer its Social Security taxes if it has taken out a PPP loan and all or any portion of the loan is forgiven. The new FAQs clarify that, once an employer receives… Continue Reading

Evaluating Performance Goals and Incentive Compensation in Light of COVID-19

Boards and compensation committees will be reevaluating their incentive compensation arrangements in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting market uncertainty. Both long-term and short-term incentive plans can lose motivational and retention value if the performance goals are unachievable or if they do not align with market reality. Companies that have not yet established performance goals for their 2020 equity and bonus awards should carefully consider market conditions and shareholder perception before establishing goals, focusing on motivating their executives with pay for performance that aligns with shareholders?ÇÖ interests, while giving the company flexibility to navigate through uncharted territory. To the extent possible, companies should also consider delaying the issuance of incentive compensation awards until there is more stability in the business and in the financial markets. Companies that have already established goals for their 2020 awards (or that are evaluating the continued effectiveness of performance goals for prior year… Continue Reading

Retirement Plan Issues and COVID-19: Additional Relief Issued By IRS

The IRS issued Notice 2020-23 (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥), postponing various employee benefit related deadlines under the Internal Revenue Code. Under the Notice, the due dates of many tax payments and filings that would ordinarily fall on or after April 1, 2020 through July 14, 2020 were automatically extended to July 15, 2020. For example, Forms 990 that would have been due for calendar year filers on May 15, 2020 and Form 990-T that would have been due for calendar year filers on April 15, 2020 are now not due until July 15, 2020. Note that this relief will not apply to Forms 5500 for plans with calendar year plan years since those Forms 5500 are due July 30, 2020, which is currently outside of the relief period. The Notice also provides relief to any plan performing one of 44 time-sensitive actions that are listed under Revenue Procedure 2018-58. To the extent… Continue Reading

October 2021
S M T W T F S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Archives