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IRS Issues Updated FAQs on Certain COVID-Related Employer Tax Credits

The IRS recently issued updated FAQs related to the expanded paid sick and family leave tax credits authorized under the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 (the ?Ç£CAA?Ç¥). Specifically, the CAA extends through March 31, 2021, the availability of paid sick and family leave credits, which were first adopted in the Families First Coronavirus Response Act in March 2020. The extended paid leave tax credits are not new benefits and simply extend the period of time during which eligible employers may claim the credits. Consequently, if an employer has already claimed the maximum amount of these tax credits, they will not be eligible to claim additional paid leave tax credits. For additional information on the paid sick and family leave tax credits, please see our prior blog posts here and here.  The IRS has yet to update its FAQs for changes made in the CAA to the terms and conditions of… Continue Reading

Extension of Employment Tax Deadlines

Pursuant to Section 274 of the COVID-related Tax Relief Act of 2020, the IRS recently issued Notice 2021-11 which extends the repayment dates for the payroll tax deferral relief provided under IRS Notice 2020-65 (discussed in our prior blog post here). Under IRS Notice 2020-65, deferred employment taxes had to be withheld and remitted to the IRS in substantially equivalent installments from wages or other compensation paid to employees between January 1, 2021 and April 30, 2021, with interest and penalties on unpaid deferred taxes beginning to accrue on May 1, 2021. Under Notice 2021-11, the timing for withholding and payment of these taxes is extended through December 31, 2021, and the date that interest and penalties begin to accrue on unpaid deferred taxes is delayed until January 1, 2022. Notice 2021-11 is available here.

The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 and Benefits Changes Employers Need to Focus on Right Now

Retirement Plans Additional Relief May Help Prevent Partial Plan Terminations The recently adopted Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 (the ?Ç£CAA?Ç¥) provides relief for qualified retirement plans of employers that had to reduce their workforce as a result of the pandemic (through furloughs, layoffs, or terminations) for plan years that include the period beginning on March 13, 2020 and ending on March 31, 2021. Specifically, these plans shall not be treated as incurring a partial plan termination if the number of active participants covered by the plan on March 31, 2021 is at least 80% of the number of active participants that were covered by the plan on March 13, 2020. A partial plan termination generally occurs when more than 20% of a plan?ÇÖs participants are terminated in a plan year. If a partial plan termination occurs, then the plan is required to 100% vest any ?Ç£affected employees?Ç¥. ?Ç£Affected employees?Ç¥ are… Continue Reading

The DOL Finalizes the Prohibited Transaction Exemption Covering Investment Advice Fiduciaries

The DOL recently finalized Prohibited Transaction Exemption 2020-02 ?Çô Improving Investment Advice for Workers & Retirees (?Ç£PTE 2020-02?Ç¥) for investment advice fiduciaries.?á PTE 2020-02 finalizes the proposed exemption which we previously reported on here.?á This guidance for investment advice fiduciaries completes the regulatory process that began in 2016 with the new fiduciary regulations and exemptions issued under the Obama administration, which were vacated in 2018, and the reinstatement of prior regulations and the issuance of new exemption guidance earlier this year.?á While PTE 2020-02 makes some changes to the proposed exemption, it largely retains the proposed exemption?ÇÖs protective framework, including the ?Ç£Impartial Conduct Standards?Ç¥ (under which investment advice fiduciaries must provide advice that is in the retirement investor?ÇÖs ?Ç£best interest?Ç¥), required disclosures, implementation of policies and procedures to comply with the standards and mitigate conflicts of interest, and retrospective compliance review.?á The final exemption also includes a self-correction mechanism for… Continue Reading

Ordinary Employee Benefits Issues That Can Cause Extraordinary Problems in M&A Deals

Employee benefits rarely drive corporate transactions, but if the benefits of a target company are not reviewed carefully, they can sometimes derail the transaction.  Even some of the most routine facets of benefit plan administration can result in significant potential financial exposure (e.g., additional employer contributions, taxes, penalties, and fees as well as fees associated with the preparation and filing of IRS and DOL correction program applications) that could negatively affect the overall value of the target company. By identifying issues early in the transaction, the seller can prevent costly purchase price reductions and identify issues that need correction, while the buyer can avoid overpaying for a target and ensure that representation and warranty insurance will be available to cover potential claims. Some of those routine compliance issues include, but are not limited to, the following: Failing to timely file an annual Form 5500.  The DOL can assess a penalty… Continue Reading

Last Day for Coronavirus-Related Distributions is December 30, 2020

As a reminder, the last day that coronavirus-related distributions may be made from an eligible retirement plan to a qualified individual is December 30, 2020, and not December 31, 2020.?á Distributions may be included in income ratably over the 2020, 2021, and 2022 tax years or, if the participant elects, may be included entirely in income in 2020.?á For more information on coronavirus-related distributions, please see the IRS FAQs here.

IRS Issues Final Regulations Regarding Timing of Qualified Plan Loan Offset Amount Rollovers

The IRS recently issued final regulations relating to amendments made to Code Section 402(c) by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the ?Ç£TCJA?Ç¥).?á The TCJA provides an extended rollover period for plan loan offset amounts that are treated as distributed from a qualified plan due to (i) termination of the plan or (ii) failure to repay the loan due to the participant?ÇÖs severance from employment, each a ?Ç£qualified plan loan offset?Ç¥ (?Ç£QPLO?Ç¥).?á Although most of the general rules relating to plan loan offsets apply to QPLO amounts, the permissible rollover period is extended.?á Generally, a participant has only 60 days to contribute the loan offset amount in a tax-free rollover to another qualified retirement plan.?á However, a participant may roll over QPLO amounts into another qualified retirement plan until the due date for his or her personal income tax return for the year in which the QPLO occurred.… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Safe Harbor Plan Guidance on Sections 102 and 103 of the SECURE Act

The IRS recently issued Notice 2020-86 (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥), which provides guidance through a series of questions and answers with respect to Sections 102 and 103 of the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019 (the ?Ç£SECURE Act?Ç¥). Section 102 of the SECURE Act increases the maximum automatic elective deferral percentage for automatic enrollment safe harbor plans from 10% to 15% (provided, however, that the maximum automatic deferral rate remains 10% during the initial period of automatic elective contributions).  Notably, the Notice clarifies that a QACA safe harbor 401(k) plan is not required to increase the maximum percentage, so long as the percentage is (i) applied uniformly, (ii) does not exceed 15% (or 10% during the initial period of automatic elective contributions), and (iii) satisfies certain other minimum percentage requirements as described in Code Section 401(k)(13)(C)(iii).  The Notice also clarifies that, if a plan incorporates the maximum qualified… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Additional Guidance on Certain Coronavirus-Related Tax Credits

In a new series of FAQs, the IRS issued additional guidance on tax credits for qualified family leave wages and qualified sick leave wages provided under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the ?Ç£FFCRA?Ç¥). The first set of FAQs explains what amounts can be counted as qualified family leave wages for purposes of the tax credit granted for such amounts. The second set of FAQs explains how to determine the amount of qualified health plan expenses for purposes of the tax credits for qualified family leave wages and qualified sick leave wages, including how health plan expenses may be calculated for self-funded and fully insured plans, as well as how to calculate health plan expenses when an employer offers more than one health plan or other health-related benefits, such as health flexible spending accounts and health savings accounts. Links to the guidance are below, and more detailed information on the… Continue Reading

Qualified Transportation Fringe Benefits in the Time of COVID ?Çô IRS Provides an Overview on Treatment of Unused Amounts and Changes to Elections

Prior to the pandemic, many employees used qualified transportation fringe benefits, such as receiving mass transit passes or paying for on-site parking on a pre-tax basis, to help defray the costs of getting to the office. As a result of the pandemic, many workers are working from home, with no need to pay for on-site parking or reap the benefit of employer-provided mass transit passes. The pandemic has also caused some employees to change their mode of transportation, with many deciding to forgo the use of mass transit to drive their own vehicles to work. A recent IRS information letter outlined some options available to employees whose use of qualified transportation has changed throughout the course of the pandemic. Under the example in the information letter, an employee was no longer using mass transit, and so, no longer needed to use compensation deductions to pay for mass transit passes. Instead,… Continue Reading

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