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Nothing in Life is Free ?Çô ERISA Expense Account Considerations

Many 401(k) plans contain spending accounts funded by revenue-sharing generated by a plan?ÇÖs mutual fund holdings. These accounts, often referred to as ERISA expense accounts, revenue-sharing accounts, or plan expense reimbursement accounts, can cause complications for plans if not administered properly. These revenue-sharing accounts can accumulate quickly, and in large plans, can result in hundreds of thousands of dollars each year. However, plan sponsors often do not know that the accounts are accumulating, and when they find them, may think they have just discovered ?Ç£free money.?Ç¥ But nothing in life is free, and missteps with the use of these funds could result in participant claims. Accordingly, before utilizing these funds, plan sponsors should use care and consider the following questions: Are the funds being held in the trust??áDOL Advisory Opinion 2013-03A (which is available here) noted that revenue sharing payments that were being received by the third party administrator prior… Continue Reading

The DOL Announces a Non-Enforcement Policy on Final ESG Investment and Proxy Voting Rules

On March 10, 2021, the DOL released an enforcement policy statement (the ?Ç£Statement?Ç¥), which announced that until the DOL publishes further guidance, it will not enforce the recently issued ?Ç£Financial Factors in Selecting Plan Investments?Ç¥ final rule (the ?Ç£ESG Rule?Ç¥) and the ?Ç£Fiduciary Duties Regarding Proxy Voting and Shareholder Rights?Ç¥ final rule (the ?Ç£Proxy Voting Rule?Ç¥, together with the ESG Rule referred to herein as, the ?Ç£Final Rules?Ç¥). The ESG Rule generally required plan fiduciaries to select investments and investment courses of action based solely on consideration of ?Ç£pecuniary factors,?Ç¥ and the Proxy Voting Rule set forth a plan fiduciary?ÇÖs obligations when voting proxies and exercising other shareholder rights in connection with plan investments. The implementation of the ESG Rule in particular has caused concerns for plan fiduciaries about the use of environment, social, and governance considerations in its investment decisions and has been met with increasing criticism from a… Continue Reading

New Year’s Resolutions to Ensure Proper ERISA Fiduciary and HIPAA Privacy Training

With the start of the new year, a good New Year?ÇÖs resolution for employers that sponsor ERISA retirement and/or health and welfare benefit plans is to ensure that all current ERISA plan fiduciaries?Çöincluding any new members of plan administrative and investment committees?Çöhave received up-to-date ERISA fiduciary training. ERISA litigation brought against individual plan fiduciaries has significantly increased in recent years. Plan fiduciaries assume responsibilities and make decisions that could potentially subject them to substantial personal liability. To mitigate this risk exposure, each committee member (or other ERISA plan fiduciary) should receive fiduciary training initially upon becoming a plan fiduciary and at least annually thereafter. Plan fiduciaries need to understand (i) when they are acting on behalf of the plan?ÇÖs participants in a fiduciary capacity, (ii) the different fiduciary roles under a plan and how fiduciary liability can attach in different ways, (iii) the difference between fiduciary decisions and non-fiduciary (?Ç£settlor?Ç¥)… Continue Reading

Is it Time for an Investment Committee Tune-up?

Companies sponsoring a 401(k) plan to help their employees save for retirement often form an investment committee to help select plan investments without realizing the duties that the committee assumes.?á To help prevent investment committee members from unintentionally breaching their fiduciary duties, companies periodically review their investment committee compliance and should keep complete records of appointments, policies, and procedures.?á The following investment committee checklist can be a starting point for this review: Review the underlying plan document to determine who it lists as the ?Ç£named fiduciary?Ç¥.?á Most plan documents provided by third party administrators list the ?Ç£plan sponsor?Ç¥ as the named fiduciary, which means the board of directors is the governing body responsible for acting as a fiduciary, absent a delegation of such fiduciary responsibility by the board of directors to a committee.?á If your plan lists the ?Ç£plan sponsor?Ç¥ as the named fiduciary and you have a committee selecting… Continue Reading

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