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Filing a Form 5558 for Retroactively Adopted Plans Does Not Establish a 2020 Form 5500 Filing Requirement

In August 2021, the IRS issued guidance clarifying that certain plans retroactively adopted after the end of the plan year would not have to file a 2020 Form 5500 series return, which we previously discussed in our blog post here. Recently, the IRS further clarified that if a plan sponsor already submitted a Form 5558 (Application for Extension of Time to File Certain Employee Plan Returns) for a retroactively adopted plan, the submission of such Form 5558 would not require such plan to file a 2020 Form 5500. The IRS stated that the filing of the Form 5558 will not result in an IRS delinquency notice if no 2020 Form 5500 is ever filed for the plan specified in the Form 5558. The delinquency notices are based on when the Form 5500 is filed and not the filing of aForm 5558.   IRS newsletters are available here.

New IRS Guidance on Excess COVID Related Employment Tax Credits

The IRS recently released proposed regulations related to excess employment tax credits claimed by employers under the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021. Specifically, the proposed regulations clarify that any paid sick and family leave credits or employee retention tax credits that were refunded or credited to an employer in excess of the credits the employer was actually entitled to claim will be treated as an underpayment of the applicable employment taxes that will be collected by the IRS in accordance with its customary assessment and collection procedures. For additional information on the requirements and limitations related to these employment tax credits, please see our prior blog posts here, here, and here.  The proposed regulations are available here.

IRS Explains Certain Plans Retroactively Adopted After the End of Plan Year Are Not Required to File a Form 5500 for 2020

The IRS recently explained in an announcement that certain retirement plans adopted after the close of the employer’s taxable year will not be required to file a Form 5500 for 2020. Specifically, under the SECURE Act, an employer may adopt a retirement plan after the close of the employer’s taxable year (by the due date, including extensions, for filing its tax return for the taxable year) and elect to treat the plan as having been adopted as of the last day of the taxable year. This provision of the SECURE Act only applies to plans adopted for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2019. In its announcement, the IRS explained that if an employer adopted a plan during the employer’s 2021 taxable year, by the specified deadline, and elected to treat the plan as having been adopted as of the last day of the employer’s 2020 taxable year, then the… Continue Reading

Additional Guidance on Claiming Employee Retention Tax Credit for Q3 and Q4 of 2021

The IRS recently released Notice 2021-49 (the “Notice”), which provides additional guidance for employers who are claiming the employee retention tax credit for the third and fourth quarters of 2021 based on enhancements to the tax credit enacted in the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (the “ARPA”). The ARPA extended the employee retention tax credit for “qualified wages” paid to employees between July 1st and December 31st of 2021, and the Notice clarifies that the rules applicable to claiming the enhanced employee retention tax credit under the ARPA are generally the same as those for claiming the credit under the CARES Act. The Notice provides additional guidance on several miscellaneous issues with respect to the credit and also responds to questions received by the IRS related to the credit, including, among others: The definition of full-time employee and whether that definition includes full-time equivalents; The treatment of tips as… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Additional Guidance Regarding COBRA Premium Subsidy

As we previously reported here, the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (?Ç£ARPA?Ç¥) provides a 100% COBRA premium subsidy to any qualified beneficiary who is entitled to COBRA coverage due to an involuntary termination of employment or reduction in hours of employment. Employers will receive a tax credit for the cost of COBRA premiums for April 1 to September 30, 2021. The IRS recently issued FAQs addressing many issues related to the subsidy, including: (i) subsidy eligibility, (ii) what qualifies as a reduction in hours or an involuntary termination of employment, (iii) the type of coverage eligible for the subsidy, (iv) when the subsidy period begins and ends, (v) the extended election period, (vi) coordination with the extended deadlines due to the COVID national emergency (?Ç£Outbreak Period Extensions?Ç¥), (vii) payments to insurers, (viii) application to state continuation coverage, and (ix) calculation and claiming of the subsidy tax credit. One of… Continue Reading

IRS Releases 2022 Inflation-Adjusted Amounts for HSAs and HDHPs

The IRS recently issued Rev. Proc. 2021-25, which sets the 2022 calendar year limits on (i) annual contributions that can be made to a health savings account (?Ç£HSA?Ç¥) and (ii) annual deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums under a high deductible health plan (?Ç£HDHP?Ç¥). The 2022 limits are as follows: Annual HSA contribution limits: $3,650 for self-only coverage ($50 increase from 2021) and $7,300 for family coverage ($100 increase from 2021); Minimum HDHP deductibles: $1,400 for self-only coverage (no change from 2021) and $2,800 for family coverage (no change from 2021); and HDHP out-of-pocket maximum limits: $7,050 for self-only coverage ($50 increase from 2021) and $14,100 for family coverage ($100 increase from 2021). Rev. Proc. 2021-25 is available here.

Updates on Employee Benefits Regulations Impacted by the Biden Administration?ÇÖs Regulatory Freeze

On January 20, 2021, the Biden Administration issued a memorandum (the ?Ç£Memo?Ç¥) calling for a 60-day freeze on regulations that had not taken effect as of the date of the Memo, which included certain regulations related to employee benefits (see our prior blog post regarding the Memo here). The Memo also authorized additional postponement of such regulations following the 60-day period where deemed necessary for further review. Listed below are some of the previously discussed proposed and final regulations related to employee benefits that were impacted by the Memo and updates to their effective dates: Independent Contractor Status Under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Final Rule. Effective date is delayed until May 7, 2021. There is also a proposed withdrawal of this rule with comments due by April 12, 2021. Medicare Program; Secure Electronic Prior Authorization for Medicare Part D. Final Rule. Effective date was delayed until March 30, 2021.… Continue Reading

IRS Issues New FAQs on Claiming the Employee Retention Credit

The IRS recently issued Notice 2021-20, which contains 71 new FAQs related to the employee retention credit (the ?Ç£ERT?Ç¥) available on qualified wages paid between March 13, 2020 and December 31, 2020. The new FAQs do not address changes to the ERT enacted as part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 on qualified wages paid between January 1, 2021 and June 30, 2021, which the IRS says will be addressed in future guidance. The FAQs provide numerous, helpful examples of how to apply key definitions and other provisions applicable to the ERT, such as who is an eligible employer; what constitutes a full or partial suspension of a trade or business, a significant decline in gross receipts, qualified wages, and allocable qualified health plan expenses; and the interaction of the ERT and Paycheck Protection Program loan recipients, among other topics. For additional information on the ERT, please see our prior… Continue Reading

Employee Benefits Regulations Potentially Impacted by the Biden Administration?ÇÖs Regulatory Freeze

On January 20, 2021, the Biden Administration issued a memorandum (the ?Ç£Memo?Ç¥) announcing a regulatory freeze on regulations that have not taken effect as of the date of the Memo. Specifically, the Memo recommends postponing the effective date of any regulation that has been issued, but has not taken effect, for 60 days from the date of the Memo. The Memo further directs that regulations not yet published in the Federal Register be immediately withdrawn for review. Listed below are some of the proposed and final regulations related to employee benefits that may be subject to withdrawal or postponement under the Memo: Prohibited Transaction Exemption 2020-02 ?Çô Improving Investment Advice for Workers & Retirees. Final Rule. Application of the Employer Shared Responsibility Provisions and Certain Nondiscrimination Rules to Health Reimbursement Arrangements and Other Account-Based Group Health Plans Integrated with Individual Health Insurance Coverage or Medicare. Final Rule. Pension Benefit Statements-Lifetime… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Updated FAQs on Certain COVID-Related Employer Tax Credits

The IRS recently issued updated FAQs related to the expanded paid sick and family leave tax credits authorized under the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 (the ?Ç£CAA?Ç¥). Specifically, the CAA extends through March 31, 2021, the availability of paid sick and family leave credits, which were first adopted in the Families First Coronavirus Response Act in March 2020. The extended paid leave tax credits are not new benefits and simply extend the period of time during which eligible employers may claim the credits. Consequently, if an employer has already claimed the maximum amount of these tax credits, they will not be eligible to claim additional paid leave tax credits. For additional information on the paid sick and family leave tax credits, please see our prior blog posts here and here.  The IRS has yet to update its FAQs for changes made in the CAA to the terms and conditions of… Continue Reading

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