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IRS Expands Definition of Qualified Individual for Loans and Coronavirus-Related Distributions under the CARES Act

Notice 2020-50 provides additional guidance to taxpayers and sponsors of qualified retirement plans regarding coronavirus-related distributions and loan extensions under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the ?Ç£CARES Act?Ç¥). Among the guidance included in Notice 2020-50 are the following three items of special importance to plan sponsors: Notice 2020-50 expands the definition of ?Ç£Qualified Individual?Ç¥ for purposes of eligibility to receive a coronavirus-related distribution or special loan treatment to also include three new categories of individuals: an individual having a reduction in pay (or self-employment income) due to COVID-19 or having a job offer rescinded or start date for a job delayed due to COVID-19; an individual whose spouse or a member of the individual?ÇÖs household (as defined below) is quarantined, furloughed or laid off, or has work hours reduced due to COVID-19, is unable to work due to lack of childcare due to COVID-19, has a reduction… Continue Reading

PCORI Fee is Back and There?ÇÖs No Relief From Its Deadline: July 31, 2020

The plan year ending before October 1, 2019 was supposed to be the last year that the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (?Ç£PCORI?Ç¥) fee was required to be paid. However, legislation passed in December 2019 extended the PCORI fee for another ten years. Recognizing that plan sponsors believed the PCORI fee was ending and may not have anticipated the need to identify the number of covered lives to determine the PCORI fee, the IRS issued transition relief for the plan year ending before October 1, 2020. Under this transition relief, in addition to using one of the three methods specified in the regulations, plan sponsors may use any reasonable method for calculating the average number of covered lives. For the plan year ending on or after October 1, 2019 and before October 1, 2020, the PCORI fee is $2.54 times the average number of covered lives. Payment of the PCORI fee… Continue Reading

Health and Welfare Issues and COVID-19: Reminder: Decrease in Pay/Hours Does Not Permit Dropping Health Plan Coverage If There is No Loss of Eligibility

As many employers reduce employees?ÇÖ work hours, employers should consider that employees will remain responsible for their health plan contributions even though their pay is decreasing. As long as eligibility for coverage does not change, an employee is not permitted to change his or her health plan elections due solely to the decrease in pay or hours. One exception to this general rule is a change in status event created in connection with the Affordable Care Act, which provides that, in certain circumstances, an employee with reduced work hours may drop health plan coverage if the employee enrolls in other health plan coverage. Because the reduced pay may not cover all payroll deductions, employers should consider adopting a priority order for payroll deductions (e.g., health plan deductions are made before 401(k) plan deductions). In addition, an employer may want to consider a waiver of premiums, which is permitted if done… Continue Reading

Retirement Plan Issues and COVID-19: Additional Relief Issued By IRS

The IRS issued Notice 2020-23 (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥), postponing various employee benefit related deadlines under the Internal Revenue Code. Under the Notice, the due dates of many tax payments and filings that would ordinarily fall on or after April 1, 2020 through July 14, 2020 were automatically extended to July 15, 2020. For example, Forms 990 that would have been due for calendar year filers on May 15, 2020 and Form 990-T that would have been due for calendar year filers on April 15, 2020 are now not due until July 15, 2020. Note that this relief will not apply to Forms 5500 for plans with calendar year plan years since those Forms 5500 are due July 30, 2020, which is currently outside of the relief period. The Notice also provides relief to any plan performing one of 44 time-sensitive actions that are listed under Revenue Procedure 2018-58. To the extent… Continue Reading

Retirement Benefit Expenses Covered under the CARES Act?ÇÖs Paycheck Protection Program

The Paycheck Protection Program (the ?Ç£PPP?Ç¥) under the CARES Act aims to assist small businesses affected by COVID-19 by covering certain operating expenses as an incentive to retain employees during the crisis. Expenses, such as ?Ç£payroll costs,?Ç¥ are used in the calculation of the amount of the available loan and in the amount that may be forgiven under the program. Notably, the PPP does not consider an individual?ÇÖs compensation in excess of $100,000 annualized, prorated for the covered period, to be covered as a payroll cost. The ?Ç£payment of any retirement benefit[s]?Ç¥ are among the payroll costs that are included. However, at this time, it not entirely clear what is intended to be included in the ?Ç£payment of any retirement benefit.?Ç¥ No formal guidance has been issued by the IRS or Treasury, and initial guidance issued by the U.S. Small Business Administration does not shed much light on this question.… Continue Reading

CARES Act Relief Checklist: Considerations in Deciding What Relief is Right for Your Business

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the ?Ç£CARES Act?Ç¥) offers relief to businesses affected by COVID-19 through various programs, including forgivable loans and federal income tax credits. However, the CARES Act prevents businesses from claiming certain benefits that are considered duplicative.?á The following checklist outlines key considerations for businesses when selecting among the Paycheck Protection Program (the ?Ç£PPP?Ç¥), the Employee Retention Tax Credit, the Employer Social Security Tax Deferral, and Work Opportunity Tax Credit. Certain industries, such as aviation, have specialized relief, which is beyond the scope of this checklist. In deciding what relief is appropriate, businesses should consider, as discussed in detail below, employer size, what may be best for the business?ÇÖs employees, and the business?ÇÖs long-term prospects. While this checklist is designed as a tool to assist businesses in choosing the proper relief, the best way to determine which option is optimal for a particular business… Continue Reading

IRS Proposed Regulations Clarify the Definition of Tax ?Ç£Dependent?Ç¥

The IRS recently issued proposed regulations regarding the definition of ?Ç£dependent?Ç¥ under the Internal Revenue Code (?Ç£Code?Ç¥). The proposed regulations generally update existing regulations to conform to amendments previously made to Code Section 152 and other Code sections by the Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 (?Ç£WFTRA?Ç¥) and subsequent legislation. Under WFTRA, Code Section 152 was amended to provide that a federal income tax dependent is either a taxpayer?ÇÖs ?Ç£qualifying child?Ç¥ or ?Ç£qualifying relative.?Ç¥ These definitions are relevant for employers that sponsor (i) group health plans if such plans provide coverage for an employee?ÇÖs dependent who is not his or her spouse or child under age 27, but who is the employee?ÇÖs federal income tax dependent, and (ii) dependent care assistance programs which reimburse covered employees for qualifying dependent care expenses of qualifying children and certain other federal income tax dependents. The proposed regulations also provide new guidance with… Continue Reading

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