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Reminder: Employer Obligations Regarding Employee Life Insurance Coverage

In our prior blog post here, we discussed the case of Anastos v. IKEA Property, Inc., which highlighted the importance of an employer?ÇÖs understanding of how its group term life insurance coverage is impacted by changes in employment status, such as termination of employment, retirement, or a leave of absence. This understanding is necessary for the employer to correctly communicate to employees when life insurance coverage will end, when evidence of insurability will be required, and the requirements necessary to convert coverage. In Anastos, the employer drafted its retiree benefit plan to state that eligible retirees could continue life insurance and that, in most cases, coverage would be guaranteed with no medical certification required. When a retiree attempted to obtain this coverage, the employer admitted that its plan was misleading and that it could not obtain underwriting to provide that kind of life insurance continuation benefit. The retiree sued, and… Continue Reading

Reminder: A Release of Claims May Not Offer Blanket Protection Against Potential ERISA Claims

A recent federal district court case,?áAnastos v. IKEA Property, Inc., illustrates that a release agreement executed upon employment termination may not offer blanket protection for employers against potential future ERISA or other claims that arise after termination (and after the release agreement has been executed). In Anastos, an employee sued his former employer alleging the information provided to him about the employer?ÇÖs retiree life insurance program led him to believe that no medical certification would be required to continue his life insurance coverage post-retirement. After the employee retired, his employer informed him that life insurance coverage was not available post-termination under the employer-provided plan and that, instead, he would have to convert the coverage to a whole life insurance policy with MetLife. MetLife required a medical examination before it would issue the policy, and the employee would not be able to satisfy the medical examination requirement. The employer filed a… Continue Reading

Delegating Fiduciary Duties Under ERISA Plans

The recent decision in Hampton v. National Union by the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois highlights the importance of following the provisions in ERISA plan documents for delegating fiduciary duties to entities acting as plan fiduciaries, such as third-party service providers and insurers. Following the death of her husband, who was an employee of The Boeing Company (?Ç£Boeing?Ç¥), the plaintiff sought to recover accidental death and dismemberment benefits under insurance policies sponsored by Boeing, for which she was the sole designated beneficiary. After National Union, which underwrote and co-administered the policies with AIG Claims, Inc., denied the plaintiff?ÇÖs initial benefits claim, as well as her appeal of such denial, the plaintiff brought suit under ERISA. The plaintiff argued that the court should apply a de novo standard of review (i.e., no deference given to the plan fiduciary?ÇÖs prior decisions) because National Union did not have discretionary… Continue Reading

Sixth Circuit Upholds Decision that Divorce Decree Delivered After Death Is QDRO

A couple entered into a separation agreement, which was later incorporated into a divorce decree, in which they agreed to maintain any employer-related life insurance policies for the benefit of their minor child until she turned 18 or graduated from high school. At the time, the father had an employer-sponsored life insurance policy through Sun Life that listed his uncle as the sole beneficiary. The father died without changing the designated beneficiary to his daughter. After his death, but before payment of the life insurance benefits, the daughter?ÇÖs attorney provided Sun Life with a copy of the divorce decree and separation agreement. Nevertheless, Sun Life paid the benefits to the deceased father?ÇÖs uncle, and the daughter then sued Sun Life for failing to follow the terms of a qualified domestic relations order (?Ç£QDRO?Ç¥). A federal district court originally held that the daughter was entitled to the life insurance benefits, and… Continue Reading

Employer?ÇÖs Fiduciary Liability for Failing to Provide Life Insurance Conversion Notice

An employee went out on long-term disability leave due to a brain tumor. The employee and his wife had a meeting with the employer?ÇÖs benefits team, during which the couple was told ?Ç£everything would remain the same,?Ç¥ including how to keep their benefits the same during and after the leave period. However, conversion of the employee?ÇÖs life insurance coverage after his leave expired was not discussed. The employee was mailed a leave packet describing the continuation of benefits during leave; it stated that life insurance could be continued for the duration of the leave, that a conversion policy may be available, and to contact the benefits department for specific details. When the life insurance benefit claim was submitted after the employee?ÇÖs death, the benefits employee indicated that the employee was still on a FMLA leave of absence, and life insurance coverage was still in effect at the time of death,… Continue Reading

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