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IRS Updates Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Audit Technique Guide

The IRS recently updated its Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Audit Technique Guide (the “Updated Guide”), which replaces the previous version published in June 2015. The Updated Guide provides more detailed guidance on the legal standards applicable to deferred compensation arrangements, including the addition of specific citations to relevant regulations and revenue rulings. Notably, the Updated Guide also includes significantly expanded discussions about Code Section 409A and its application to deferred compensation arrangements. Code Section 409A, and other regulations impacting deferred compensation, are very complicated and can carry substantial penalties and taxes for noncompliance. As Congress and the Biden Administration look for additional sources of funding for their initiatives, heightened IRS audit activity may be on the horizon. The Updated Guide is a good reminder to employers that they should periodically review their nonqualified deferred compensation arrangements, not only for documentary compliance but operational compliance as well. The Updated Guide is available… Continue Reading

Supreme Court Rejects Challenge to the Affordable Care Act

On June 17, 2021, the U.S. Supreme Court in California v. Texas rejected a challenge to the Affordable Care Act (the ?Ç£ACA?Ç¥) by holding the plaintiffs lacked standing to bring suit. In 2018, Texas, along with a coalition of over a dozen states and two individuals, brought suit challenging the constitutionality of the individual mandate under the ACA after the penalty for failing to comply was set to zero dollars in 2017. The Supreme Court held that, because the individual mandate is unenforceable, the plaintiffs lacked standing because they had not shown a past or future injury that is fairly traceable. Notably, the Supreme Court did not rule on the constitutionality of the ACA. California v. Texas, 593 U.S. ___ (2021) is available here. 

DOL Increases Civil Monetary Penalties for Certain ERISA Violations

The DOL recently issued a final rule that adjusts for inflation the amounts of civil monetary penalties assessed or enforced in its regulations, including for certain ERISA violations. The adjusted penalty amounts apply to penalties assessed after January 15, 2021 and for which the associated violations occurred after November 2, 2015. Some of the penalties that were increased include the following: The maximum penalty for failing to properly file a pension or welfare benefit plan?ÇÖs annual Form 5500 increased from $2,233 per day to $2,259 per day. The maximum penalty for failing to provide notices of blackout periods or of the right to divest employer securities increased from $141 per day to $143 per day (each statutory recipient is a separate violation). The maximum penalty for failing to provide employees the required Children?ÇÖs Health Insurance Program (CHIP) coverage notices increased from $119 per day to $120 per day (each employee… Continue Reading

Extension of Employment Tax Deadlines

Pursuant to Section 274 of the COVID-related Tax Relief Act of 2020, the IRS recently issued Notice 2021-11 which extends the repayment dates for the payroll tax deferral relief provided under IRS Notice 2020-65 (discussed in our prior blog post here). Under IRS Notice 2020-65, deferred employment taxes had to be withheld and remitted to the IRS in substantially equivalent installments from wages or other compensation paid to employees between January 1, 2021 and April 30, 2021, with interest and penalties on unpaid deferred taxes beginning to accrue on May 1, 2021. Under Notice 2021-11, the timing for withholding and payment of these taxes is extended through December 31, 2021, and the date that interest and penalties begin to accrue on unpaid deferred taxes is delayed until January 1, 2022. Notice 2021-11 is available here.

Ordinary Employee Benefits Issues That Can Cause Extraordinary Problems in M&A Deals

Employee benefits rarely drive corporate transactions, but if the benefits of a target company are not reviewed carefully, they can sometimes derail the transaction.  Even some of the most routine facets of benefit plan administration can result in significant potential financial exposure (e.g., additional employer contributions, taxes, penalties, and fees as well as fees associated with the preparation and filing of IRS and DOL correction program applications) that could negatively affect the overall value of the target company. By identifying issues early in the transaction, the seller can prevent costly purchase price reductions and identify issues that need correction, while the buyer can avoid overpaying for a target and ensure that representation and warranty insurance will be available to cover potential claims. Some of those routine compliance issues include, but are not limited to, the following: Failing to timely file an annual Form 5500.  The DOL can assess a penalty… Continue Reading

Last Year for Leniency on Forms 1095-C

In keeping with prior years, the IRS has extended the due date for providing the 2020 Forms 1095-B and C to individuals until March 2, 2021. These forms are required for compliance with the Affordable Care Act (?Ç£ACA?Ç¥). In Notice 2020-76, the IRS also extended the good-faith transition relief for penalties related to incomplete or incorrect Forms 1095-B and C to 2020. Notice 2020-76 also states that this is the last year for which the IRS intends to provide this type of good-faith relief. This relief was especially helpful for employers who received ACA employer penalty notices and determined that the penalty notices were related to reporting errors on their Form 1095-C. Employers should thus ensure that all software errors and glitches that resulted in incorrect coding on Forms 1095-C are resolved before the 2021 reporting is due. Notice 2020-76 is available here.

Annual Increases in Civil Monetary Penalties for Violations of HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules

HHS recently issued a final rule (the ?Ç£HHS Rule?Ç¥) that sets out the inflation-adjusted civil monetary penalty (?Ç£CMP?Ç¥) amounts that HHS is authorized to assess or enforce, including for violations of the HIPAA privacy and security rules. The adjusted CMP amounts are applicable to HIPAA violations by a HIPAA covered entity or business associate that occur after November 2, 2015, for which a CMP is assessed on or after November 5, 2019?á The HHS Rule is available here.

Civil Monetary Penalties Increased for Violations of HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (?Ç£HHS?Ç¥) recently issued an interim final rule (the ?Ç£HHS Rule?Ç¥), which sets out inflation adjustments to the civil monetary penalty (?Ç£CMP?Ç¥) amounts that HHS is authorized to assess or enforce, including for violations of the HIPAA privacy and security rules. The HHS Rule was issued for compliance with the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015, which was enacted on November 2, 2015 (the ?Ç£2015 Act?Ç¥). The 2015 Act requires federal agencies to (i) adjust the level of CMP amounts with an initial ?Ç£catch up?Ç¥ adjustment and (ii) make subsequent annual adjustments for inflation. The HIPAA CMP amounts had not been adjusted since 2009. Under the HHS Rule, HIPAA CMP amounts are increased by 10.2% for violations of the HIPAA privacy or security rules by a covered entity or a business associate, as follows:       Prior $$… Continue Reading

DOL Increases Civil Penalties for Various ERISA Violations

On July 1, 2016, the DOL issued an interim final rule that adjusts the amounts of civil penalties assessed or enforced in its regulations, including for violations of ERISA. The penalties that were increased include the following, among many others: (1) the penalty for a failure to properly file a pension or welfare plan?ÇÖs Form 5500 increased from up to $1,100 per day to up to $2,063 per day; (2) the penalty for a failure to notify participants of certain benefit restrictions under Code Section 436 or to furnish automatic contribution arrangement notices increased from up to $1,000 per day to up to $1,632 per day; (3) the penalty for a failure to provide notices of blackout periods, or notice of the right to divest employer securities, increased from up to $100 per day to up to $131 per day; and (4) the penalty for a failure to provide employees… Continue Reading

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