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Proposed Required Minimum Distribution Regulations Clarify Application of Ten-Year Rule for Designated Beneficiaries

The IRS recently issued proposed regulations interpreting the changes in the required minimum distribution requirements resulting from enactment of the SECURE Act. Under the ten-year rule, a distribution of the participant’s entire interest must be made to a designated beneficiary who is not an eligible designated beneficiary within ten years after the death of the participant, regardless of whether the owner died before reaching his or her required beginning date. Among the proposed regulations, the IRS clarified that if a participant dies following his or her required beginning date, in addition to satisfying the ten-year rule, the participant’s benefit must also continue to be distributed to the beneficiary at least as rapidly as it was being distributed when the participant died.  The IRS Proposed Regulations are available here.

New Proposed Regulations May Signal Administration Shift in Focus to Benefit Plans

Whenever a new president from a different political party is elected, it’s not unusual for plan sponsors to expect changes in policy resulting in new laws and regulations impacting benefit plans. Though President Biden’s administration primarily focused on the pandemic and other areas of foreign and domestic policy in its first year, it recently has turned its attention to benefit plans with the issuance of two new proposed regulations, as described below.   Proposed Regulations on Required Minimum Distributions – On February 24, 2022, the IRS released proposed regulations that update the required minimum distribution requirements to reflect changes made by the SECURE Act and contain additional guidance regarding required minimum distribution requirements. The IRS is currently taking comments on the proposed regulations until May 25, 2022.  Proposed Regulations on Prohibited Transaction Exemption Filing Procedures – The DOL recently announced proposed amendments to the procedures governing the filing and processing of… Continue Reading

Federal Agencies Issue Proposed Revisions to Form 5500 Return/Report

The DOL, PBGC, and IRS (the “Agencies”) recently issued a Notice of Proposed Revision (the “Notice”) to update the Form 5500 Annual Return/Report filed for employee pension and welfare benefit plans. The DOL simultaneously issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to implement the revisions proposed in the Notice. These proposed revisions primarily relate to certain statutory amendments to ERISA and the Code enacted as part of the SECURE Act and include other changes intended to improve Form 5500 reporting. Specifically, the Notice describes the following proposed revisions to the Form 5500 Annual Return/Report:  Consolidation of the Form 5500 reporting requirement for defined contribution retirement plan groups by (i) adding a new type of direct filing entity called a “defined contribution group” reporting arrangement, and (ii) establishing a new reporting schedule for such arrangement; Modifications to reflect pooled employer plans as a type of multiple employer pension plan (“MEP”) and implement… Continue Reading

New IRS Guidance on Excess COVID Related Employment Tax Credits

The IRS recently released proposed regulations related to excess employment tax credits claimed by employers under the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021. Specifically, the proposed regulations clarify that any paid sick and family leave credits or employee retention tax credits that were refunded or credited to an employer in excess of the credits the employer was actually entitled to claim will be treated as an underpayment of the applicable employment taxes that will be collected by the IRS in accordance with its customary assessment and collection procedures. For additional information on the requirements and limitations related to these employment tax credits, please see our prior blog posts here, here, and here.  The proposed regulations are available here.

Updates on Employee Benefits Regulations Impacted by the Biden Administration?ÇÖs Regulatory Freeze

On January 20, 2021, the Biden Administration issued a memorandum (the ?Ç£Memo?Ç¥) calling for a 60-day freeze on regulations that had not taken effect as of the date of the Memo, which included certain regulations related to employee benefits (see our prior blog post regarding the Memo here). The Memo also authorized additional postponement of such regulations following the 60-day period where deemed necessary for further review. Listed below are some of the previously discussed proposed and final regulations related to employee benefits that were impacted by the Memo and updates to their effective dates: Independent Contractor Status Under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Final Rule. Effective date is delayed until May 7, 2021. There is also a proposed withdrawal of this rule with comments due by April 12, 2021. Medicare Program; Secure Electronic Prior Authorization for Medicare Part D. Final Rule. Effective date was delayed until March 30, 2021.… Continue Reading

Employee Benefits Regulations Potentially Impacted by the Biden Administration?ÇÖs Regulatory Freeze

On January 20, 2021, the Biden Administration issued a memorandum (the ?Ç£Memo?Ç¥) announcing a regulatory freeze on regulations that have not taken effect as of the date of the Memo. Specifically, the Memo recommends postponing the effective date of any regulation that has been issued, but has not taken effect, for 60 days from the date of the Memo. The Memo further directs that regulations not yet published in the Federal Register be immediately withdrawn for review. Listed below are some of the proposed and final regulations related to employee benefits that may be subject to withdrawal or postponement under the Memo: Prohibited Transaction Exemption 2020-02 ?Çô Improving Investment Advice for Workers & Retirees. Final Rule. Application of the Employer Shared Responsibility Provisions and Certain Nondiscrimination Rules to Health Reimbursement Arrangements and Other Account-Based Group Health Plans Integrated with Individual Health Insurance Coverage or Medicare. Final Rule. Pension Benefit Statements-Lifetime… Continue Reading

Get Ready to Update HIPAA Privacy Policies Next Year

Last week, HHS issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that proposes changes to the HIPAA Privacy Rule that will affect HIPAA privacy policies and procedures for employer group health plans.?á The proposed revisions affect (i) an individual?ÇÖs right to access ?Ç£protected health information?Ç¥ (?Ç£PHI?Ç¥), (ii) the content required in the Notice of Privacy Practices, and (iii) the ability to use and disclose PHI based on professional judgment, to avert a threat to health or safety, or for coordination of care and case management.?á HHS proposed that compliance with the changes would be required within 180 days after the effective date of a final rule.?á HHS has requested comments on the proposed changes within 60 days after their publication in the Federal Register, which publication should occur soon.?á The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking is available here.

Proposed Rule Addressing Fiduciary Duties of Prudence and Exclusive Purpose with Respect to Proxy Voting and the Exercise of Shareholder Rights

The DOL?árecently published a proposed rule (the ?Ç£Proposed Rule?Ç¥) that would amend the current investment duties regulations to provide guidance regarding how plan fiduciaries should exercise their duties of prudence and exclusive purpose with respect to proxy voting and the exercise of shareholder rights. Prior to the Proposed Rule, the DOL had addressed such fiduciary duties in sub-regulatory guidance and individual letters, which did not provide plan fiduciaries with consistent and clear guidance on how they must exercise their duties for proxy voting and other exercises of shareholder rights. Specifically, the Proposed Rule: Codifies the DOL?ÇÖs long-standing position that plan ?Ç£fiduciaries must carry out their duties prudently and solely in the interests of the participants and beneficiaries and for the exclusive purpose of providing benefits to participants and beneficiaries and defraying the reasonable expenses of administering the plan?Ç¥ when deciding whether, and when, to exercise shareholder rights, including the voting… Continue Reading

DOL Issues Proposed Rule to Amend the Investment Duties Regulation

The DOL?árecently issued a proposed rule to amend the ?Ç£investment duties?Ç¥ regulation at found at 29 CFR 2550.404a-1 (the ?Ç£Regulation?Ç¥). The proposed rule would provide investment guidance to ERISA plan fiduciaries in light of recent trends in environmental, social, and governance (?Ç£ESG?Ç¥) investing. ERISA requires plan fiduciaries to act ?Ç£solely?Ç¥ in the interest of plan participants and beneficiaries and for the ?Ç£exclusive purpose?Ç¥ of providing benefits and paying reasonable administrative expenses and prudently selecting investments for the plan. In the past, the DOL has periodically issued guidance addressing fiduciary duties under ERISA with respect to ESG-based investment decisions, including Interpretive Bulletin 94-1, which described a ?Ç£tie-breaker standard,?Ç¥ whereby ESG considerations could be the deciding factor when competing investments served the plan?ÇÖs economic interests equally. Later Interpretive Bulletins emphasized that it would be a violation of ERISA to accept reduced returns in favor of ESG goals, but that in certain cases,… Continue Reading

IRS Proposed Regulations Address the Elimination of the Deduction for Certain Qualified Transportation Fringe Expenses

On June 23, 2020, the IRS released proposed regulations regarding the deduction of certain employer-provided transportation and commuting benefits to reflect changes made to Section 274 of the Internal Revenue Code by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the ?Ç£TCJA?Ç¥). The TCJA eliminated deductions by employers for qualified transportation fringe (?Ç£QTF?Ç¥) expenses for amounts paid or incurred in the taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017. Key issues addressed in the proposed regulations include: (i) the amount of parking expenses that is not deductible when an employer owns or leases the parking facility; (ii) the amount of QTF expenses that is not deductible when an employer pays a third party to provide QTF benefits; (iii) the amount of certain expenses or reimbursements relating to transportation between an employee?ÇÖs residence and place of employment that is not deductible; and (iv) the application of exceptions that may allow certain QTF expenses to… Continue Reading

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