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Additional Guidance on Claiming Employee Retention Tax Credit for Q3 and Q4 of 2021

The IRS recently released Notice 2021-49 (the “Notice”), which provides additional guidance for employers who are claiming the employee retention tax credit for the third and fourth quarters of 2021 based on enhancements to the tax credit enacted in the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (the “ARPA”). The ARPA extended the employee retention tax credit for “qualified wages” paid to employees between July 1st and December 31st of 2021, and the Notice clarifies that the rules applicable to claiming the enhanced employee retention tax credit under the ARPA are generally the same as those for claiming the credit under the CARES Act. The Notice provides additional guidance on several miscellaneous issues with respect to the credit and also responds to questions received by the IRS related to the credit, including, among others: The definition of full-time employee and whether that definition includes full-time equivalents; The treatment of tips as… Continue Reading

American Rescue Plan Enhancements to Employee Retention Credit

The American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (?Ç£ARPA?Ç¥) extended the employee retention credit through the end of 2021 and enhanced the scope of employers eligible to claim the credit by adding two new employer categories: (i) ?Ç£recovery startup businesses?Ç¥ and (ii) ?Ç£severely financially distressed employers?Ç¥.?á A ?Ç£recovery startup business?Ç¥ is a business that was created after February 15, 2020 and has annual gross receipts of no more than $1,000,000. Recovery startup businesses may claim the employee retention credit (capped at $50,000 per quarter) even if they do not otherwise qualify for the credit (i.e., they neither experienced a complete or partial shutdown due to a COVID-19 governmental shutdown order nor had a decrease in gross receipts of at least 20% for the applicable quarter). A ?Ç£severely financially distressed employer?Ç¥ is an employer who had a decrease in gross receipts of at least 90% for the applicable quarter, and such employers… Continue Reading

IRS Issues New FAQs on Claiming the Employee Retention Credit

The IRS recently issued Notice 2021-20, which contains 71 new FAQs related to the employee retention credit (the ?Ç£ERT?Ç¥) available on qualified wages paid between March 13, 2020 and December 31, 2020. The new FAQs do not address changes to the ERT enacted as part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 on qualified wages paid between January 1, 2021 and June 30, 2021, which the IRS says will be addressed in future guidance. The FAQs provide numerous, helpful examples of how to apply key definitions and other provisions applicable to the ERT, such as who is an eligible employer; what constitutes a full or partial suspension of a trade or business, a significant decline in gross receipts, qualified wages, and allocable qualified health plan expenses; and the interaction of the ERT and Paycheck Protection Program loan recipients, among other topics. For additional information on the ERT, please see our prior… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Additional Guidance on Certain Coronavirus-Related Tax Credits

In a new series of FAQs, the IRS issued additional guidance on tax credits for qualified family leave wages and qualified sick leave wages provided under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the ?Ç£FFCRA?Ç¥). The first set of FAQs explains what amounts can be counted as qualified family leave wages for purposes of the tax credit granted for such amounts. The second set of FAQs explains how to determine the amount of qualified health plan expenses for purposes of the tax credits for qualified family leave wages and qualified sick leave wages, including how health plan expenses may be calculated for self-funded and fully insured plans, as well as how to calculate health plan expenses when an employer offers more than one health plan or other health-related benefits, such as health flexible spending accounts and health savings accounts. Links to the guidance are below, and more detailed information on the… Continue Reading

CARES Act: Calculating Qualified Health Plan Expenses for Purposes of the Employee Retention Credit

Under the CARES Act, employers are eligible to claim an employee retention credit if certain conditions are met (see our prior blog post on the employee retention credit, as well as other employee benefits and executive compensation changes made by the CARES Act, here). The tax credit is equal to 50% of ?Ç£qualified wages?Ç¥ paid to employees of up to $10,000. Qualified wages include (i) wages actually paid to covered employees (other than qualified paid sick and family leave wages for which a credit is allowed under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act) and (ii) the ?Ç£qualified health plan expenses?Ç¥ allocable to such employees. On May 11, 2020, the IRS published new FAQs clarifying how qualified health plan expenses should be calculated for purposes of the employee retention credit. Notably, the FAQs provide guidance on how to calculate such expenses when an employer sponsors more than one health plan (e.g.,… Continue Reading

CARES Act: Additional Guidance on the Interplay Between Social Security Tax Deferrals and Forgiveness of PPP Loans

In a new set of FAQs, the IRS clarifies that an employer who receives a loan under the Paycheck Protection Program (?Ç£PPP?Ç¥) may also defer payment of the employer portion of Social Security taxes due on eligible wages until the employer receives notice from its PPP lender that the loan has been forgiven. Under the CARES Act, employers of all sizes may defer payment of their portion of Social Security taxes due on wages earned between March 27, 2020 and December 31, 2020, until December 31, 2021 (50% of the deferred taxes are due) and December 31, 2022 (the remaining deferred taxes are due), subject to certain restrictions. One of those restrictions is that an employer may not defer its Social Security taxes if it has taken out a PPP loan and all or any portion of the loan is forgiven. The new FAQs clarify that, once an employer receives… Continue Reading

EMPLOYEE BENEFIT/EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION CHANGES MADE BY THE CARES ACT

On March 27, 2020, Congress passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the ?Ç£CARES Act?Ç¥). This historic $2 trillion relief package received bipartisan support and is part of the third wave of federal government support as the nation copes with the acute economic fallout from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.  Some of the key provisions of the CARES Act that apply to health and welfare plans, educational assistance programs, retirement plans, executive compensation programs, and employment and payroll taxes are outlined below. Health and Welfare Plans Q1.      What COVID-19 testing and treatment is our company?ÇÖs employer-sponsored group health plan required to cover? The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (?Ç£FFCRA?Ç¥) requires an employer-sponsored group health plan (including a grandfathered plan under the Affordable Care Act (?Ç£ACA?Ç¥)) (a ?Ç£Plan?Ç¥) to provide coverage for COVID-19 diagnostic testing and services related to the diagnostic testing without any cost sharing (including deductibles, copayments, and… Continue Reading

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