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Required Minimum Distributions: A Tragedy in Three Acts

The SECURE Act and CARES Act made significant changes to required minimum distributions (?Ç£RMDs?Ç¥). What should you be doing to ensure your retirement plans are administered correctly? The first step is to understand your options. SECURE Act Shifts the Start Before the SECURE Act, RMDs had to begin by April 1st of the calendar year following the later of (i) the calendar year during which the participant retires or (ii) the calendar year in which the participant turns age 70??.?á Following the passage of the SECURE Act, the age cutoff in that rule changed from age 70?? to age 72, but only for individuals who turned age 70?? on or after January 1, 2020 (i.e., individuals born on or after July 1, 1949). In short, those terminated vested participants born before July 1, 1949 had to start their RMDs by April 1 of the year after turning 70??, while those… Continue Reading

Future Updates on the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021

We previously provided an overview of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 (the ?Ç£CAA?Ç¥) and the specific benefits changes employers need to focus on right now, which can be found here. There were numerous other provisions of the CAA that will impact retirement and group health plans. As the effective dates for those other provisions approach, we will provide you with a summary of the new provisions and how they may impact your plans.

The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 and Benefits Changes Employers Need to Focus on Right Now

Retirement Plans Additional Relief May Help Prevent Partial Plan Terminations The recently adopted Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 (the ?Ç£CAA?Ç¥) provides relief for qualified retirement plans of employers that had to reduce their workforce as a result of the pandemic (through furloughs, layoffs, or terminations) for plan years that include the period beginning on March 13, 2020 and ending on March 31, 2021. Specifically, these plans shall not be treated as incurring a partial plan termination if the number of active participants covered by the plan on March 31, 2021 is at least 80% of the number of active participants that were covered by the plan on March 13, 2020. A partial plan termination generally occurs when more than 20% of a plan?ÇÖs participants are terminated in a plan year. If a partial plan termination occurs, then the plan is required to 100% vest any ?Ç£affected employees?Ç¥. ?Ç£Affected employees?Ç¥ are… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Safe Harbor Plan Guidance on Sections 102 and 103 of the SECURE Act

The IRS recently issued Notice 2020-86 (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥), which provides guidance through a series of questions and answers with respect to Sections 102 and 103 of the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019 (the ?Ç£SECURE Act?Ç¥). Section 102 of the SECURE Act increases the maximum automatic elective deferral percentage for automatic enrollment safe harbor plans from 10% to 15% (provided, however, that the maximum automatic deferral rate remains 10% during the initial period of automatic elective contributions).  Notably, the Notice clarifies that a QACA safe harbor 401(k) plan is not required to increase the maximum percentage, so long as the percentage is (i) applied uniformly, (ii) does not exceed 15% (or 10% during the initial period of automatic elective contributions), and (iii) satisfies certain other minimum percentage requirements as described in Code Section 401(k)(13)(C)(iii).  The Notice also clarifies that, if a plan incorporates the maximum qualified… Continue Reading

Substantial Changes to Norwegian Defined Contribution Plans Effective January 1, 2021

As reported by the U.S. Social Security Administration (the ?Ç£SSA?Ç¥), Norway finalized certain legal and operational changes to employer defined contribution pension plans to be effective January 1, 2021, which include: (i) eliminating vesting periods for employer contributions; (ii) permitting employees to select pension providers other than the ones chosen by their employers for administration of the employee?ÇÖs defined contribution account balances; and (iii) unless an employee opts out, automatically transferring all of an employee’s account balances under his or her prior employer defined contribution plans into the employee’s account under his or her current employer?ÇÖs defined contribution plan. Information on these changes is available on the SSA’s website here.

Is it Time for an Investment Committee Tune-up?

Companies sponsoring a 401(k) plan to help their employees save for retirement often form an investment committee to help select plan investments without realizing the duties that the committee assumes.?á To help prevent investment committee members from unintentionally breaching their fiduciary duties, companies periodically review their investment committee compliance and should keep complete records of appointments, policies, and procedures.?á The following investment committee checklist can be a starting point for this review: Review the underlying plan document to determine who it lists as the ?Ç£named fiduciary?Ç¥.?á Most plan documents provided by third party administrators list the ?Ç£plan sponsor?Ç¥ as the named fiduciary, which means the board of directors is the governing body responsible for acting as a fiduciary, absent a delegation of such fiduciary responsibility by the board of directors to a committee.?á If your plan lists the ?Ç£plan sponsor?Ç¥ as the named fiduciary and you have a committee selecting… Continue Reading

IRS Issue Snapshot Highlights Plan Sponsor Responsibilities to Missing Participants and Beneficiaries

The IRS recently published an Issue Snapshot (the ?Ç£Snapshot?Ç¥) on IRS.gov that revisits the steps a plan sponsor must complete in order to locate missing plan participants and beneficiaries. While the Snapshot does not contain any new guidance, its publication is an indication that ensuring plan sponsors are undertaking appropriate steps to locate missing participants and beneficiaries remains an area of focus for the IRS, including when they are conducting plan audits. Under current IRS guidance, plan sponsors should complete the following steps to attempt to locate missing plan participants and beneficiaries: Search for alternate contact information (address, telephone number, email, etc.) held by the plan or any related plan, sponsor, or publicly-available records or directories. Use a commercial locator service, credit reporting agency, or proprietary Internet search tool for locating individuals. Mail a letter via certified mail to the last known mailing address and through any appropriate means for… Continue Reading

Postponed Deadline for Reporting and Payment of Excise Taxes

The IRS recently released Announcement 2020-17 (the ?Ç£Announcement?Ç¥) postponing the due dates for reporting and paying excise taxes related to certain delayed minimum required contributions to single employer defined benefit plans. The Announcement only applies to excise taxes under Internal Revenue Code Sections 4971(a)(1) (failure to meet minimum funding standards) and 4971(f)(1) (failure to pay liquidity shortfall). Generally, these taxes must be reported and paid by the last day of the seventh month after the end of the employer?ÇÖs tax year or eight and one-half months after the last day of the plan year that ends with or within the filer?ÇÖs tax year. However, because the CARES Act postpones the deadline to make minimum required contributions that are otherwise due in 2020 until January 1, 2021, the Department of Treasury and the IRS are extending the deadline to report and pay the excise taxes under Sections 4971(a)(1) and 4971(f)(1) with… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Guidance on Certain Changes Made Under the Secure Act and the Miners Act

The IRS recently issued Notice 2020-68 (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥), which contains several sets of questions and answers that provide helpful guidance regarding various provisions in the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019 (the ?Ç£SECURE Act?Ç¥) and Section 104 of the Bipartisan American Miners Act of 2019 (the ?Ç£Miners Act?Ç¥). Specifically, the Notice addresses certain issues concerning the following provisions of the SECURE Act: The small employer automatic enrollment credit; The repeal of the maximum age for traditional IRA contributions; Participation of long-term, part-time employees in 401(k) plans; Qualified birth or adoption distributions; and Permitting excluded ?Ç£difficulty of care payments?Ç¥ to be taken into account as compensation for purposes of determining certain retirement contribution limits. The Notice also provides guidance with respect to the reduction in minimum age for in-service distributions as provided in the Miners Act. In addition, the Notice sets forth the deadlines to amend retirement… Continue Reading

The Supreme Court Holds Participants in Fully-Funded Defined Benefit Plans Cannot Sue for Fiduciary Breach

The U.S. Supreme Court held Monday that participants in a fully-funded defined benefit plan have no standing to bring a lawsuit against plan fiduciaries for a breach of ERISA?ÇÖs fiduciary requirements. In Thole, plan participants alleged that the plan fiduciaries had mismanaged funds and invested in imprudent investments causing the plan to lose approximately $748 million more than it otherwise should have during the 2008 recession. Subsequent to that date, the plan sponsor contributed an additional $311 million to the plan resulting in the plan becoming fully funded. The Court held that because the participants would receive the same benefits whether they won or lost the lawsuit, there was no controversy and, therefore, the participants had no standing under Article III of the U.S. Constitution to bring a civil action under Sections 502(a)(2) or 502(a)(3) of ERISA. Thole v. U.S. Bank N.A., No. 17?Çô1712 (U.S. June 1, 2020) can be… Continue Reading

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