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IRS Further Extends Temporary Relief from Physical Presence Requirement for Certain Retirement Plan Consents

As we previously reported here, in June 2020, the IRS issued Notice 2020-42 (available here) which provided temporary relief from the physical presence requirements for certain participant and beneficiary elections under qualified retirement plans. The IRS recently issued an advance version of Notice 2021-40 (available here) which extends the temporary relief for an additional year, through June 30, 2022. Under this extended relief, participant elections, including spousal consents, that require a signature to be witnessed in the physical presence of a notary public will meet the ?Ç£physical presence?Ç¥ requirement if remote notarization is done through live audio-video technology that otherwise satisfies the requirements of Treasury Regulations ?º 1.401(a)-21(d)(6) and is compliant with state law applicable to notaries. Participant elections, including spousal consents, that require a signature to be witnessed in the physical presence of a plan representative will meet the ?Ç£physical presence?Ç¥ requirement if (i) the person signing the participant… Continue Reading

Fifth Circuit Decision is a Reminder to Employers on Structuring Severance Plans

Last week?ÇÖs decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in Atkins v. CB&I, LLC is a reminder that employers may prefer to structure bonus and severance programs so as to be covered by ERISA and thus avoid being subject to unfavorable state laws. In Atkins, five employees brought suit in Louisiana state court claiming their employer?ÇÖs project incentive bonus plan?Çöwhich pays a single bonus payment to employees who are laid off or complete their roles in a specific project?Çöconstituted an illegal wage forfeiture agreement under the Louisiana Wage Payment Act. Each of the employees had quit and consequently forfeited their bonuses under the plan?ÇÖs terms. The employer removed the suit to federal district court claiming the bonus plan was a severance plan subject to ERISA and thus ERISA, as controlling federal law, preempted the employees?ÇÖ state law claims. The district court agreed. The Fifth Circuit reversed… Continue Reading

It?ÇÖs All Part of the Plan ?Çô Consistency is Key to Treating Multiple Documents as One Plan

Plan sponsors of severance plans that set forth the terms of one severance plan in multiple plan documents should consider combining those documents into one document or carefully reviewing each plan document to ensure there are no inconsistencies (including relating to eligibility, effective dates, and benefits) and that each document not only references the other documents but is incorporated into the other documents by reference. Otherwise, the plan sponsor may risk one of the documents being deemed a pay practice exempt from ERISA, subjecting the plan sponsor to state law claims in any state where employees are covered. This risk was recently highlighted in Caggiano v. Teva Pharm. USA, Inc., where former employees (?Ç£Plaintiffs?Ç¥) of Teva Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (?Ç£Defendant?Ç¥) brought two state law causes of action against Defendant based on the denial of separation pay benefits under Defendant?ÇÖs severance plan, which was comprised of a Separation Benefits Plan (?Ç£SBP?Ç¥), a… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Guidance on Employer COVID-19 Leave-Based Charitable Donation Payments

In Notice 2020-46, the IRS provided guidance allowing employers to make cash payments to certain charitable organizations in exchange for vacation, sick, or personal leave that its employees elect to forgo without otherwise including such amounts in the employees?ÇÖ gross income. In order to qualify for this relief, the payments must be made to a qualifying charitable organization no later than December 31, 2020?áfor the relief of victims of the COVID-19 pandemic as set forth in President Trump?ÇÖs March 13, 2020 declaration of a nationwide emergency (a copy of which is available here). The employees will not be treated as constructively receiving any of the amounts they elect to forgo under the program, and the employees cannot claim a charitable contribution deduction with respect to the value of the forgone paid leave. Employers should (i) make sure that any election made by their employees is in writing and the recipient… Continue Reading

Use Care When Implementing CARES Act Retirement Plan Distributions ?Çô State Law and Benefit Offset Concerns

As we have previously reported on our blog here and here, the CARES Act provided relief to participants in retirement plans by allowing employers to amend their retirement plans to include certain coronavirus-related distributions and to permit increased loan amounts for certain qualified individuals. Many employers have agreed to adopt these changes, and under federal law, the treatment of these distributions is clear. But there are other issues that employers and employees should consider, including: The coronavirus-related distributions could be subject to taxation under state law, even if the employee later repays the distribution to the plan; and If employees are receiving unemployment and/or disability benefits, the coronavirus-related distributions may reduce or offset these benefits. However, the enhanced loans would not be subject to taxation and may not offset unemployment and disability benefits, which may make the enhanced loan a better option for employees who anticipate paying back the distribution.… Continue Reading

Connecticut Passes Law Mandating Paid Sick Leave

The Connecticut legislature recently passed Public Act 11-52 which, effective as of January 1, 2012, will require most employers that employ 50 or more individuals in Connecticut to provide certain employees with paid sick leave accruing at a rate of one hour per 40 hours worked, up to a maximum of 40 hours of sick leave in a calendar year.?á The law provides paid sick leave to “service workers” who are paid hourly and work in one of the various occupation categories identified in the law.?á Exceptions are made for certain manufacturing entities and tax-exempt nationally chartered organizations which provide services in recreation, child care, and education, as well as for employers with respect to day or temporary workers and non-hourly salaried professionals.?á Employers are deemed in compliance if they provide other leave (e.g., vacation, personal days or time off) that accrues as quickly as required under the law and… Continue Reading

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