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New IRS Guidance on Excess COVID Related Employment Tax Credits

The IRS recently released proposed regulations related to excess employment tax credits claimed by employers under the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021. Specifically, the proposed regulations clarify that any paid sick and family leave credits or employee retention tax credits that were refunded or credited to an employer in excess of the credits the employer was actually entitled to claim will be treated as an underpayment of the applicable employment taxes that will be collected by the IRS in accordance with its customary assessment and collection procedures. For additional information on the requirements and limitations related to these employment tax credits, please see our prior blog posts here, here, and here.  The proposed regulations are available here.

Additional Guidance on Claiming Employee Retention Tax Credit for Q3 and Q4 of 2021

The IRS recently released Notice 2021-49 (the “Notice”), which provides additional guidance for employers who are claiming the employee retention tax credit for the third and fourth quarters of 2021 based on enhancements to the tax credit enacted in the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (the “ARPA”). The ARPA extended the employee retention tax credit for “qualified wages” paid to employees between July 1st and December 31st of 2021, and the Notice clarifies that the rules applicable to claiming the enhanced employee retention tax credit under the ARPA are generally the same as those for claiming the credit under the CARES Act. The Notice provides additional guidance on several miscellaneous issues with respect to the credit and also responds to questions received by the IRS related to the credit, including, among others: The definition of full-time employee and whether that definition includes full-time equivalents; The treatment of tips as… Continue Reading

New Required COBRA Premium Subsidy

Beginning on April 1, 2021, the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (“ARPA“) will provide a 100% COBRA premium subsidy (the ?Ç£Subsidy?Ç¥) to any qualified beneficiary who is entitled to COBRA coverage due to an involuntary termination of employment or reduction in hours of employment. Under the ARPA, the federal government will reimburse the employer, in the form of a tax credit, the cost of the premiums for up to six months, from April 1 to September 30, 2021. Specifically, the Subsidy will end on the earliest of: (i) September 30, 2021; (ii) the date the qualified beneficiary becomes eligible for other health plan coverage or Medicare; or (iii) the date the qualified beneficiary?ÇÖs COBRA coverage period ends. Further, any individual who would have been eligible for the Subsidy, had he or she previously elected, or continued, COBRA coverage, will have another opportunity to elect COBRA coverage under a special… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Updated FAQs on Certain COVID-Related Employer Tax Credits

The IRS recently issued updated FAQs related to the expanded paid sick and family leave tax credits authorized under the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 (the ?Ç£CAA?Ç¥). Specifically, the CAA extends through March 31, 2021, the availability of paid sick and family leave credits, which were first adopted in the Families First Coronavirus Response Act in March 2020. The extended paid leave tax credits are not new benefits and simply extend the period of time during which eligible employers may claim the credits. Consequently, if an employer has already claimed the maximum amount of these tax credits, they will not be eligible to claim additional paid leave tax credits. For additional information on the paid sick and family leave tax credits, please see our prior blog posts here and here.  The IRS has yet to update its FAQs for changes made in the CAA to the terms and conditions of… Continue Reading

CARES Act: Additional Guidance on Interplay Between PPP Loans and Employee Retention Tax Credit

Under the CARES Act, employers who receive a Paycheck Protection Program (?Ç£PPP?Ç¥) loan are ineligible to claim the employee retention tax credit. On May 6, 2020, the Small Business Administration (?Ç£SBA?Ç¥) updated its FAQs on PPP loans to address situations when an employer received a PPP loan but now decides to repay it by the safe harbor deadline of May 14, 2020. Specifically, new Q/A-45 states that if such an employer repays its PPP loan by May 14, 2020, the employer will be eligible to claim the employee retention tax credit, provided the employer meets the other requirements to claim that credit. The SBA FAQs are available here.

CARES Act: Additional Guidance on the Interplay Between Social Security Tax Deferrals and Forgiveness of PPP Loans

In a new set of FAQs, the IRS clarifies that an employer who receives a loan under the Paycheck Protection Program (?Ç£PPP?Ç¥) may also defer payment of the employer portion of Social Security taxes due on eligible wages until the employer receives notice from its PPP lender that the loan has been forgiven. Under the CARES Act, employers of all sizes may defer payment of their portion of Social Security taxes due on wages earned between March 27, 2020 and December 31, 2020, until December 31, 2021 (50% of the deferred taxes are due) and December 31, 2022 (the remaining deferred taxes are due), subject to certain restrictions. One of those restrictions is that an employer may not defer its Social Security taxes if it has taken out a PPP loan and all or any portion of the loan is forgiven. The new FAQs clarify that, once an employer receives… Continue Reading

CARES Act Relief Checklist: Considerations in Deciding What Relief is Right for Your Business

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the ?Ç£CARES Act?Ç¥) offers relief to businesses affected by COVID-19 through various programs, including forgivable loans and federal income tax credits. However, the CARES Act prevents businesses from claiming certain benefits that are considered duplicative.?á The following checklist outlines key considerations for businesses when selecting among the Paycheck Protection Program (the ?Ç£PPP?Ç¥), the Employee Retention Tax Credit, the Employer Social Security Tax Deferral, and Work Opportunity Tax Credit. Certain industries, such as aviation, have specialized relief, which is beyond the scope of this checklist. In deciding what relief is appropriate, businesses should consider, as discussed in detail below, employer size, what may be best for the business?ÇÖs employees, and the business?ÇÖs long-term prospects. While this checklist is designed as a tool to assist businesses in choosing the proper relief, the best way to determine which option is optimal for a particular business… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Additional Guidance on Coronavirus-Related Employment Tax Relief

In a series of news releases, notices, and FAQs, the IRS has begun to issue guidance on the various employer payroll tax credits and payment deferrals enacted by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the ?Ç£FFCRA?Ç¥) and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the ?Ç£CARES Act?Ç¥). Links to the guidance are below, and more detailed information on the employee benefits, compensation, and employment tax provisions of the FFCRA and CARES Act can be found on our blog here. FFCRA Tax Credits: News Release: Implementation of Paid Leave and Tax Credits under the FFCRA. FAQs: COVID-19-Related Tax Credits for Required Paid Leave Provided by Small and Midsize Businesses. Notice 2020-21: Effective Date for Employment Tax Credits under the FFCRA. CARES Act Tax Relief: News Release: Employee Retention Credit. FAQs: Employee Retention Tax Credit under the CARES Act. Notice 2020-22: Relief from Penalty for Failure to Deposit Employment Taxes. Forms… Continue Reading

EMPLOYEE BENEFIT/EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION CHANGES MADE BY THE CARES ACT

On March 27, 2020, Congress passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the ?Ç£CARES Act?Ç¥). This historic $2 trillion relief package received bipartisan support and is part of the third wave of federal government support as the nation copes with the acute economic fallout from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.  Some of the key provisions of the CARES Act that apply to health and welfare plans, educational assistance programs, retirement plans, executive compensation programs, and employment and payroll taxes are outlined below. Health and Welfare Plans Q1.      What COVID-19 testing and treatment is our company?ÇÖs employer-sponsored group health plan required to cover? The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (?Ç£FFCRA?Ç¥) requires an employer-sponsored group health plan (including a grandfathered plan under the Affordable Care Act (?Ç£ACA?Ç¥)) (a ?Ç£Plan?Ç¥) to provide coverage for COVID-19 diagnostic testing and services related to the diagnostic testing without any cost sharing (including deductibles, copayments, and… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Paid Family and Medical Leave Tax Credit FAQs

Under the American Tax Cut and Jobs Act (the ?Ç£Act?Ç¥), employers may claim a tax credit for providing paid family and medical leave to certain qualifying employees during 2018 and 2019. This paid leave program must permit qualifying employees to take leave for the reasons permitted under the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (?Ç£FMLA?Ç¥), but employers do not have to be subject to FMLA in order to qualify for the tax credit. We previously provided details about this tax credit as part of our discussion of employee compensation and benefits changes under the Act. The IRS recently issued a series of frequently asked questions (?Ç£FAQs?Ç¥) regarding this tax credit, including FAQs addressing requirements for an employer?ÇÖs program to qualify for the tax credit, qualifying employee eligibility, and how the tax credit is calculated. The FAQs also indicate that an employer cannot claim this tax credit for providing paid leave… Continue Reading

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