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IRS Issues Final Regulations Regarding Timing of Qualified Plan Loan Offset Amount Rollovers

The IRS recently issued final regulations relating to amendments made to Code Section 402(c) by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the ?Ç£TCJA?Ç¥).?á The TCJA provides an extended rollover period for plan loan offset amounts that are treated as distributed from a qualified plan due to (i) termination of the plan or (ii) failure to repay the loan due to the participant?ÇÖs severance from employment, each a ?Ç£qualified plan loan offset?Ç¥ (?Ç£QPLO?Ç¥).?á Although most of the general rules relating to plan loan offsets apply to QPLO amounts, the permissible rollover period is extended.?á Generally, a participant has only 60 days to contribute the loan offset amount in a tax-free rollover to another qualified retirement plan.?á However, a participant may roll over QPLO amounts into another qualified retirement plan until the due date for his or her personal income tax return for the year in which the QPLO occurred.… Continue Reading

December 31st Deadline to Amend Deferred Compensation Plans

The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the ?Ç£TCJA?Ç¥) significantly amended Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code (?Ç£Code?Ç¥) by expanding the definition of a ?Ç£covered employee?Ç¥ to also include an employee who was formerly a ?Ç£covered employee?Ç¥ of the publicly traded corporation (i.e., the “once a covered employee, always a covered employee”?árule). Under this expanded rule, anyone who was a covered employee of the publicly traded corporation (or any predecessor) for any taxable year beginning on or after January 1, 2017, will continue to be a covered employee for taxable years beginning in 2018 and later, even after the employee?ÇÖs separation from service. This change potentially impacts the availability of benefit payments under certain nonqualified deferred compensation plans which provide that payments may be delayed if the company?ÇÖs deduction would not be permitted under Code Section 162(m). The application of this “once-in, always-in rule” could thus result in a… Continue Reading

IRS Guidance on the Business Expense Deductions for Meals and Entertainment

On September 30, 2020, the IRS issued final regulations providing guidance on the business expense deductions for meals and entertainment under Section 274 of the Internal Revenue Code in light of changes made by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the ?Ç£TCJA?Ç¥). The TCJA eliminated most deductions for business expenses related to entertainment, amusement, or recreational activities, but allowed taxpayers to continue to deduct certain business expenses for food and beverages, as we discussed in our prior blog post here. The final regulations (i) address the elimination of the deduction for most entertainment, amusement, or recreational activity expenses; (ii) provide guidance on what constitutes entertainment for such purposes; and (iii) address the limitation on the deduction for meal expenses. The final regulations will be effective on the date of their publication in the Federal Register, which is scheduled for October 9, 2020. Taxpayers who pay or incur business expenses for… Continue Reading

IRS Proposed Regulations Address the Elimination of the Deduction for Certain Qualified Transportation Fringe Expenses

On June 23, 2020, the IRS released proposed regulations regarding the deduction of certain employer-provided transportation and commuting benefits to reflect changes made to Section 274 of the Internal Revenue Code by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the ?Ç£TCJA?Ç¥). The TCJA eliminated deductions by employers for qualified transportation fringe (?Ç£QTF?Ç¥) expenses for amounts paid or incurred in the taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017. Key issues addressed in the proposed regulations include: (i) the amount of parking expenses that is not deductible when an employer owns or leases the parking facility; (ii) the amount of QTF expenses that is not deductible when an employer pays a third party to provide QTF benefits; (iii) the amount of certain expenses or reimbursements relating to transportation between an employee?ÇÖs residence and place of employment that is not deductible; and (iv) the application of exceptions that may allow certain QTF expenses to… Continue Reading

IRS and Treasury Issue Proposed Regulations Under Code Section 162(m)

The IRS and Treasury recently issued proposed regulations under Internal Revenue Code Section 162(m) to reflect changes enacted by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (?Ç£TCJA?Ç¥) to the tax deductibility of compensation paid by publicly held corporations to certain executive officers. Code Section 162(m) disallows the deduction by any publicly held corporation for compensation paid in any taxable year to a covered employee that exceeds $1 million. The proposed regulations implement the changes from the TCJA by (i) updating the definitions of covered employee, publicly held corporation, and applicable employee compensation; (ii) implementing the elimination of the performance-based compensation exception; and (iii) clarifying the application of the ?Ç£grandfather?Ç¥ rule for outstanding compensatory arrangements that were in effect on November 2, 2017 and not modified on or after that date. The proposed regulations also provide guidance on (a) the elimination of the transition period following a corporation?ÇÖs IPO, (b) the impact… Continue Reading

IRS Provides Initial Guidance on New Tax Benefits Under Code Section 83(i)

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 amended Section 83 of the Internal Revenue Code by adding a new Section 83(i) (?Ç£Code Section 83(i)?Ç¥), which allows certain employees of privately-held corporations to defer the recognition of income (for up to five years) attributable to the vesting or receipt of certain qualified company stock transferred to such employees upon the exercise of stock options or the settlement of restricted stock units. On December 7, 2018, the IRS released Notice 2018-97, which provides initial guidance on certain aspects of Code Section 83(i). In particular, the notice provides guidance on (i) the application of the requirement in Code Section 83(i)(2)(C)(i)(II) that equity grants be made to at least 80 percent of all employees who provide services to the corporation in the United States, (ii) the application of tax withholdings on the deferred income related to the qualified company stock, and (iii) the… Continue Reading

IRS Announces Proposed Regulations Implementing New Hardship Distribution Requirements

The IRS recently published proposed regulations addressing changes enacted by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, and other prior changes to the tax code. Specifically, the proposed regulations: Permit, but don?ÇÖt require, hardship distributions from a participant?ÇÖs elective contributions, QNECs, QMACs (including safe harbor matching contributions), and any earnings on those amounts, regardless of when they were contributed or earned Eliminate the requirement that a participant take out all available plan loans before receiving a hardship distribution (although plans may continue to contain such a requirement) Prohibit plans from containing a requirement that a participant may not contribute to the plan for any period of time following a hardship distribution (in other words, eliminate the six-month suspension rule). If a suspension is still being applied as of January 1, 2019 for a prior hardship distribution, a plan may eliminate the suspension as… Continue Reading

IRS Guidance Regarding Deductibility of Business Meal Expenses

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the ?Ç£Tax Act?Ç¥), passed at the end of last year, revised Section 274 of the Internal Revenue Code to generally disallow a deduction for expenses with respect to entertainment, amusement, or recreation. However, the Tax Act does not specifically address the deductibility of expenses for business meals. The IRS intends to publish proposed regulations clarifying when business meal expenses are nondeductible entertainment expenses and when they are 50 percent deductible expenses. Until the proposed regulations are effective, a taxpayer can rely on the transitional guidance in IRS Notice 2018-76 to determine whether the taxpayer can deduct 50 percent of a business meal expense. View the IRS Notice 2018-76.

Employee Compensation and Benefits Changes Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

The following post is a general summary of the changes to the Internal Revenue Code made by the recently enacted Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the ?Ç£Act?Ç¥) that affect employee compensation and benefits: Executive Compensation Updates Loss of Deduction for Compensation in Excess of $1 Million Currently, Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code limits the ability of publicly held corporations to deduct annual compensation paid to a ?Ç£covered employee?Ç¥ in excess of $1 million, with an exception to this limit for certain performance-based compensation. Beginning on and after January 1, 2018, the Act amends Code Section 162(m) to eliminate the exception for ?Ç£qualified performance-based compensation?Ç¥ (which includes stock options, stock appreciation rights, and compensation paid upon the attainment of pre-established performance goals) and commissions. There is limited grandfathering relief available under the Act that preserves the deductibility of existing arrangements that pay out after 2017, provided the ?Ç£written binding… Continue Reading

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