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Postponed Deadline for Reporting and Payment of Excise Taxes

The IRS recently released Announcement 2020-17 (the “Announcement”) postponing the due dates for reporting and paying excise taxes related to certain delayed minimum required contributions to single employer defined benefit plans. The Announcement only applies to excise taxes under Internal Revenue Code Sections 4971(a)(1) (failure to meet minimum funding standards) and 4971(f)(1) (failure to pay liquidity shortfall). Generally, these taxes must be reported and paid by the last day of the seventh month after the end of the employer’s tax year or eight and one-half months after the last day of the plan year that ends with or within the filer’s tax year. However, because the CARES Act postpones the deadline to make minimum required contributions that are otherwise due in 2020 until January 1, 2021, the Department of Treasury and the IRS are extending the deadline to report and pay the excise taxes under Sections 4971(a)(1) and 4971(f)(1) with… Continue Reading

May I or Must I: Questions Remain on Implementing Payroll Tax Deferral Executive Order

On Friday, August 28th, just two business days prior to the September 1st effective date of the executive order (the “Executive Order”) directing the Treasury Secretary to defer the withholding and payment of the employee portion of Social Security taxes otherwise due on wages paid to eligible employees for the last four months of 2020, the IRS issued Notice 2020-65 (the “Notice”), which provides additional guidance (discussed in the following paragraph) on implementing that tax deferral. Notably, however, the Notice did not answer two key questions for employers and employees alike: (1) is the tax deferral mandatory, and (2) who is ultimately responsible for remitting any deferred taxes to the IRS when they become due (i.e., what if an employee’s future paycheck is insufficient to cover the deferred taxes or if the employer is unable to recoup deferred taxes from a former employee). The Executive Order permits the deferral of… Continue Reading

Changes to Safe Harbor Notices for Recipients of Eligible Rollover Distributions

The IRS recently issued Notice 2020-62 (the “Notice”), which modifies the two safe harbor explanations set forth in Notice 2018-74 that plan administrators may use to satisfy the requirements under Code Section 402(f) that plans provide certain information regarding eligible rollover distributions to participants, beneficiaries, and alternate payees who are receiving distributions. The modifications to these explanations reflect recent legislative changes, including those made by the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019 (SECURE Act), and include a new exception to the 10% additional tax for qualified birth or adoption distributions and the increase in age for required minimum distributions to age 72 for employees born after June 30, 1949. The Notice also includes an updated (i) model safe harbor notice for distributions that are not from a designated Roth account and (ii) model safe harbor notice for distributions that are from a designated Roth account. Plan… Continue Reading

The IRS Amends COVID-19 Relief to Add Additional Time-Sensitive Actions

Previously, IRS Notice 2020-23 extended the due dates for certain tax payments, filings, and other “Time-Sensitive Actions” that would ordinarily fall on or after April 1, 2020 through July 14, 2020 to July 15, 2020. See our prior blog post on Notice 2020-23 here. The IRS recently issued Notice 2020-35 to make additional Time-Sensitive Actions eligible for relief. For example, under this new guidance, an employer that receives a compliance statement issued under the voluntary correction program (VCP) component of the Employee Plans Compliance Resolution System (EPCRS) with a 150-day deadline to implement all corrective actions that ends between April 1, 2020 through July 14, 2020 has until July 15, 2020 to implement the corrections. A full list of the Time-Sensitive Actions is included in Section III.B of Notice 2020-35, which is available here.

Use Care When Implementing CARES Act Retirement Plan Distributions – State Law and Benefit Offset Concerns

As we have previously reported on our blog here and here, the CARES Act provided relief to participants in retirement plans by allowing employers to amend their retirement plans to include certain coronavirus-related distributions and to permit increased loan amounts for certain qualified individuals. Many employers have agreed to adopt these changes, and under federal law, the treatment of these distributions is clear. But there are other issues that employers and employees should consider, including: The coronavirus-related distributions could be subject to taxation under state law, even if the employee later repays the distribution to the plan; and If employees are receiving unemployment and/or disability benefits, the coronavirus-related distributions may reduce or offset these benefits. However, the enhanced loans would not be subject to taxation and may not offset unemployment and disability benefits, which may make the enhanced loan a better option for employees who anticipate paying back the distribution.… Continue Reading

Employee Benefits as Payroll Costs under the Paycheck Protection Program

Businesses that received a loan under the Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) are eligible for forgiveness of that loan if, among other things, the loan proceeds are used to cover “payroll costs” incurred over the eight-week period after the loan is made. Payroll costs, capped at $100,000 on an annualized basis for each employee (i.e., $15,384 over the eight-week period), are broadly defined to include, among other things: Salary, wages, commissions, or tips; Employee benefits costs, such as for vacation or paid family or medical leave (other than wages for which a credit is received under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act), group health care costs, retirement plan contributions, and severance benefits; and State and local taxes assessed on employee compensation. As of the date of this posting, no guidance has been issued by the IRS or the Department of Treasury to further clarify what specific items qualify as payroll costs.… Continue Reading

CARES Act: Additional Guidance on the Interplay Between Social Security Tax Deferrals and Forgiveness of PPP Loans

In a new set of FAQs, the IRS clarifies that an employer who receives a loan under the Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) may also defer payment of the employer portion of Social Security taxes due on eligible wages until the employer receives notice from its PPP lender that the loan has been forgiven. Under the CARES Act, employers of all sizes may defer payment of their portion of Social Security taxes due on wages earned between March 27, 2020 and December 31, 2020, until December 31, 2021 (50% of the deferred taxes are due) and December 31, 2022 (the remaining deferred taxes are due), subject to certain restrictions. One of those restrictions is that an employer may not defer its Social Security taxes if it has taken out a PPP loan and all or any portion of the loan is forgiven. The new FAQs clarify that, once an employer receives… Continue Reading

CARES Act Relief Checklist: Considerations in Deciding What Relief is Right for Your Business

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”) offers relief to businesses affected by COVID-19 through various programs, including forgivable loans and federal income tax credits. However, the CARES Act prevents businesses from claiming certain benefits that are considered duplicative.  The following checklist outlines key considerations for businesses when selecting among the Paycheck Protection Program (the “PPP”), the Employee Retention Tax Credit, the Employer Social Security Tax Deferral, and Work Opportunity Tax Credit. Certain industries, such as aviation, have specialized relief, which is beyond the scope of this checklist. In deciding what relief is appropriate, businesses should consider, as discussed in detail below, employer size, what may be best for the business’s employees, and the business’s long-term prospects. While this checklist is designed as a tool to assist businesses in choosing the proper relief, the best way to determine which option is optimal for a particular business… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Additional Guidance on Coronavirus-Related Employment Tax Relief

In a series of news releases, notices, and FAQs, the IRS has begun to issue guidance on the various employer payroll tax credits and payment deferrals enacted by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the “FFCRA”) and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”). Links to the guidance are below, and more detailed information on the employee benefits, compensation, and employment tax provisions of the FFCRA and CARES Act can be found on our blog here. FFCRA Tax Credits: News Release: Implementation of Paid Leave and Tax Credits under the FFCRA. FAQs: COVID-19-Related Tax Credits for Required Paid Leave Provided by Small and Midsize Businesses. Notice 2020-21: Effective Date for Employment Tax Credits under the FFCRA. CARES Act Tax Relief: News Release: Employee Retention Credit. FAQs: Employee Retention Tax Credit under the CARES Act. Notice 2020-22: Relief from Penalty for Failure to Deposit Employment Taxes. Forms… Continue Reading

April Deadline for Employers to Claim FICA Tax Refunds on 2010 Severance Pay

The issue of whether FICA payroll taxes are due on severance payments is currently being reviewed by the U.S. Supreme Court.  If the Supreme Court finds FICA taxes are not due, employers will have to file refund claims for taxes previously paid on severance payments.  Unless the Supreme Court issues its opinion before April 15, 2014, an employer must file a refund claim by that date in order to preserve a refund right for any such taxes paid in 2010. (It is already too late to file refund claims for FICA taxes paid in 2009 or earlier.)  For severance payments made in tax years after 2010, employers should wait for the Supreme Court’s decision before taking any action to avoid unnecessary expenses.  There are specific rules for filing such a refund claim, including the need to obtain employee consent to avoid reimbursement obligations to the employee, and for filing appeals… Continue Reading

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