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Additional Guidance on Claiming Employee Retention Tax Credit for Q3 and Q4 of 2021

The IRS recently released Notice 2021-49 (the “Notice”), which provides additional guidance for employers who are claiming the employee retention tax credit for the third and fourth quarters of 2021 based on enhancements to the tax credit enacted in the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (the “ARPA”). The ARPA extended the employee retention tax credit for “qualified wages” paid to employees between July 1st and December 31st of 2021, and the Notice clarifies that the rules applicable to claiming the enhanced employee retention tax credit under the ARPA are generally the same as those for claiming the credit under the CARES Act. The Notice provides additional guidance on several miscellaneous issues with respect to the credit and also responds to questions received by the IRS related to the credit, including, among others: The definition of full-time employee and whether that definition includes full-time equivalents; The treatment of tips as… Continue Reading

Equity Awards Granted to U.S. Participants by Non-U.S. Entities Can Lead to Unintended Consequences

Because of the various benefits, securities, and tax laws that apply to equity awards, what may be permissible (and even commonplace) in one jurisdiction, may be problematic in another. Accordingly, whenever an issuer desires to issue equity awards to service providers (e.g., employees or contractors) in a different jurisdiction, the issuer should engage benefits, securities, and tax counsel in all relevant jurisdictions early in the process to avoid any unanticipated issues that could negatively impact the value or purpose of the awards. For example, a common issue occurs when the issuer is an entity outside of the United States, but equity awards will also be made to service providers in the United States. Under U.S. tax law, there are specific requirements for determining the exercise price of stock options and stock appreciation rights (under Section 409A of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code (?Ç£Section 409A?Ç¥)) that require the exercise price to… Continue Reading

Ordinary Employee Benefits Issues That Can Cause Extraordinary Problems in M&A Deals

Employee benefits rarely drive corporate transactions, but if the benefits of a target company are not reviewed carefully, they can sometimes derail the transaction.  Even some of the most routine facets of benefit plan administration can result in significant potential financial exposure (e.g., additional employer contributions, taxes, penalties, and fees as well as fees associated with the preparation and filing of IRS and DOL correction program applications) that could negatively affect the overall value of the target company. By identifying issues early in the transaction, the seller can prevent costly purchase price reductions and identify issues that need correction, while the buyer can avoid overpaying for a target and ensure that representation and warranty insurance will be available to cover potential claims. Some of those routine compliance issues include, but are not limited to, the following: Failing to timely file an annual Form 5500.  The DOL can assess a penalty… Continue Reading

Federal Tax Withholding and Reporting Requirements for Distributions from a Qualified Retirement Plan to a State?ÇÖs Unclaimed Property Fund

Third party administrators for employer-sponsored qualified retirement plans often recommend to employers that unclaimed account balances for mandatory cash-outs of small amounts (under $1,000) be remitted to the unclaimed property fund for the participant?ÇÖs state of residence. The IRS recently clarified in Rev. Rul. 2020-24 that amounts remitted to a state?ÇÖs unclaimed property fund are subject to withholding under Section 3405 of the Internal Revenue Code (the ?Ç£Code?Ç¥) and, in the event the amounts distributed exceed $10, reporting under Section 6047 of the Code. A plan sponsor will not be treated as failing to comply with the withholding and reporting requirements with respect to payments made before the earlier of January 1, 2022 or the date it becomes reasonably practicable for the plan sponsor to comply with such requirements. An employer that sponsors a qualified retirement plan should discuss this guidance with their plan?ÇÖs third-party administrator to ensure that any… Continue Reading

May I or Must I: Questions Remain on Implementing Payroll Tax Deferral Executive Order

On Friday, August 28th, just two business days prior to the September 1st effective date of the executive order (the ?Ç£Executive Order?Ç¥) directing the Treasury Secretary to defer the withholding and payment of the employee portion of Social Security taxes otherwise due on wages paid to eligible employees for the last four months of 2020, the IRS issued Notice 2020-65 (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥), which provides additional guidance (discussed in the following paragraph) on implementing that tax deferral. Notably, however, the Notice did not answer two key questions for employers and employees alike: (1) is the tax deferral mandatory, and (2) who is ultimately responsible for remitting any deferred taxes to the IRS when they become due (i.e., what if an employee?ÇÖs future paycheck is insufficient to cover the deferred taxes or if the employer is unable to recoup deferred taxes from a former employee). The Executive Order permits the deferral of… Continue Reading

Changes to Safe Harbor Notices for Recipients of Eligible Rollover Distributions

The IRS recently issued Notice 2020-62 (the ?Ç£Notice?Ç¥), which modifies the two safe harbor explanations set forth in Notice 2018-74 that plan administrators may use to satisfy the requirements under Code Section 402(f) that plans provide certain information regarding eligible rollover distributions to participants, beneficiaries, and alternate payees who are receiving distributions. The modifications to these explanations reflect recent legislative changes, including those made by the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019 (SECURE Act), and include a new exception to the 10% additional tax for qualified birth or adoption distributions and the increase in age for required minimum distributions to age 72 for employees born after June 30, 1949. The Notice also includes an updated (i) model safe harbor notice for distributions that are not from a designated Roth account and (ii) model safe harbor notice for distributions that are from a designated Roth account. Plan… Continue Reading

IRS Issues Memorandum Providing Guidance on Income Inclusion, FICA, and Income Tax Withholding for Stock-Settled Equity Awards

The IRS recently issued Generic Legal Advice Memorandum No. AM 2020-004 (the ?Ç£GLAM?Ç¥) to address when income from nonqualified stock options, stock-settled stock appreciation rights, and stock-settled restricted stock units is (i) includable in an employee?ÇÖs gross income, (ii) subject to FICA taxes, and (iii) subject to federal income tax withholding. In addition, the GLAM provides a discussion of the deposit rules for FICA and income tax withholdings that have been withheld with respect to such equity awards, including the ?Ç£One-Day?Ç¥ rule (or the Next-Day Deposit Rule) that requires employers to deposit employment taxes on the next banking day after $100,000 or more in employment taxes have been accumulated. The GLAM provides a series of illustrative examples and analyses of such issues. The GLAM does not, however, address the impact of an employer?ÇÖs ability to defer employment tax deposits under Section 2302 of the Coronavirus, Aid, Relief and Economic Security… Continue Reading

Use Care When Implementing CARES Act Retirement Plan Distributions ?Çô State Law and Benefit Offset Concerns

As we have previously reported on our blog here and here, the CARES Act provided relief to participants in retirement plans by allowing employers to amend their retirement plans to include certain coronavirus-related distributions and to permit increased loan amounts for certain qualified individuals. Many employers have agreed to adopt these changes, and under federal law, the treatment of these distributions is clear. But there are other issues that employers and employees should consider, including: The coronavirus-related distributions could be subject to taxation under state law, even if the employee later repays the distribution to the plan; and If employees are receiving unemployment and/or disability benefits, the coronavirus-related distributions may reduce or offset these benefits. However, the enhanced loans would not be subject to taxation and may not offset unemployment and disability benefits, which may make the enhanced loan a better option for employees who anticipate paying back the distribution.… Continue Reading

UPDATE: Calculation of Payroll Costs for Purposes of the Paycheck Protection Program (?Ç£PPP?Ç¥)

The Small Business Administration (?Ç£SBA?Ç¥) continues to update its FAQs on PPP loans to provide additional guidance regarding what costs constitute payroll costs. Borrowers should use care in determining what amounts constitute payroll costs since borrowers are responsible for providing an accurate calculation of payroll costs and must attest to the accuracy of those calculations on their Borrower Application Form. Under the new guidance the SBA clarified: The $100,000 annualized per employee cap only applies to cash compensation and does not include any non-cash benefits, such as employer contributions to defined benefit or defined contribution retirement plans, payment for the provision of employee benefits consisting of group health care coverage, including insurance premiums, and payment of state and local taxes assessed on employees?ÇÖ compensation. PPP loans can be used to cover costs for employee paid vacation, parental, family, medical and sick leave (other than qualified sick and family wages for… Continue Reading

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